Streets

Jason Parrott / TSPR

Some Keokuk residents who live near one of the bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River are still waiting for a scenic road in front of their homes to reopen.  They are also waiting for the city to explain why it's taking so long to make that happen.

A development project in downtown Keokuk is facing a financial penalty from the city.

The former Eagles building, which is located at the corner of 4th and Blondeau Streets, is being renovated for commercial and residential use.

The project requires the replacement of an older, 1 ½” water line with a new 2” line, with the connection being made beneath Blondeau Street.

That is an issue as city code allows Keokuk to impose a penalty of up to $1,000 because crews will be cutting into a street that is less than 5-years old.

Fort Madison residents should expect some good news and some bad news from the city when they go to their mailboxes this summer.

The city council has approved the first reading of an ordinance that would decrease the water basic charge by just over $1.00/month.  The average residential household will see a decrease of 4%.

Aldermen described that as the “good news” during its most recent meeting.

The savings are linked to favorable bids for the construction of the new water plant and several transmission mains.

City leaders in Warsaw say two new taxes will result in better streets.

The city council voted, this week, to establish a pair of utility taxes.

One of the taxes would be on the electricity delivered by Ameren Illinois.

The ordinance establishes a sliding scale for residential or business use within the city.

The other tax would be on natural gas and its delivery from Nicor.

Instead of a sliding scale, residents and businesses would be charged a 5% tax.