Social Security

T.J. Carson

A candidate in the special election to replace former Congressman Aaron Schock wants to make changes to Social Security.  But he's not sharing many details.


Insurance policyholders who pay their premiums, people who work, and veterans who serve all are eligible for coverage, for wages and for benefits.

Seeing contradictions instead of complexities in attitudes and preferences by the Millennial generation is perhaps why Big Business and the elite have started focusing on 18- to 34-year-old Americans in the newest scheme to cut Social Security. But 1 percenters have misinterpreted young adults as vulnerable, dumb or both.

All the yakking about a fiscal cliff seems to fall somewhere between mistaken Mayan prophecies about Doomsday and hypersonic skydiving from space.

The lame-duck 112th Congress – hamstrung by Tea Party Republicans in the House and filibuster-happy Republicans in the Senate – is proposing to Democratic President Barack Obama that Social Security, Medicare and other social services be cut. Meanwhile, the Economic Policy Institute has released a report with a solution: Cut the deficit by growing the economy.

Rep. Dave Loebsack (D-Iowa City) used part of his time away from Washington D.C. to tour the southeast corner of his district.

He spent nearly two hours at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant in Middletown on Wednesday and more than an hour at River Hills Village in Keokuk.


Rep. Loebsack’s trip to the roughly 19,000 acre military installation took him far beyond the administrative building along Highway 34.

The Congressman got to visit the new production line for 40 mm grenades and see them being tested on a large firing range. 

Southeast Iowa’s Congressman is looking to his constituents for ideas to protect the future of Social Security.

Rep. Dave Loebsack (D-IA) says he would not be where he is today without the program.

He says Social Security helped his family get by while he was growing up and helped him afford to go to college.

The Congressman says that is why lawmakers must make sure the program remains solvent for decades to come.