WIUM Tristates Public Radio

Shop Talk

Tri States Public Radio's weekly round table discussion of media related issues featuring News Director Rich Egger and fellow panelists Jasmine Crighton, News Coordinator for the Western Illinois University Department of Broadcasting, and Jonathan Ahl, General Manager for TSPR.

Last year, Jon Daniel of Peoria had his home raided, his property seized, and he was arrested after creating a Twitter account that spoofed the city's mayor.  Legal action ensued, and last week it was announced Daniel will be awarded a $125,000 cash settlement.

Reporter Alison Parker and photographer Adam Ward of WDBJ-TV in Roanoke, Virginia, died last week when they were shot and killed while doing a live story from a water park.  The woman they were interviewing was wounded.

Podcasts vs Broadcasts

Aug 25, 2015

There is a bit of a debate right now in the public radio world about whether a greater emphasis should be placed on podcasts rather than the radio.

A recruiting manager told Shop Talk panelist Jasmine Crighton he would not hire someone she referred.  The reason?  "Questionable content" posted by the applicant on social media accounts.

The Shop Talk panelists share their thoughts on what young journalists need to know as they prepare for a job in the industry.

The NFL team told credentialed reporters they are no longer allowed to report on what they see during training camp.  They also cannot talk to players after practice without having submitted a request for approval 24 hours prior.

Columbia Journalism Review posted an article about what it's like for writers who are paid by the click.

A few months ago a New Jersey man filed a request with a local township under the state's Open Public Records Act.  The township responded by suing him.

FAIR, or Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting, recently noted, "CNN has announced the formation of a new unit that will not report the news. Instead, it will take money from corporations to produce content that resembles news but is actually PR designed to burnish its clients' images."

Former NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams was re-assigned and will now handle breaking news on cable channel MSNBC.  His fall from grace began early this year when he exaggerated some of the events that occurred while he covered the War in Iraq in 2003.

The Women's Media Center issued a report, The Status of Women in the U.S. Media 2015.   As Time Magazine noted, it paints a pretty bleak picture. Time's article is headlined, Eight Sad Truths About Women in Media.

The Washington Post recently reported on how ABC World News Tonight became the ratings champion. The Post's media reporter Paul Farhi wrote the newscast is brighter, tighter, and lighter with shorter stories and an emphasis on entertainment, crime, weather, and hot YouTube videos.

George Stephanopoulos, who hosts ABC 's "This Week" and is co-host of "Good Morning America," and who was a member of President Bill Clinton's administration, gave $75,000 to the Clinton Global Initiative, then did interviews about the foundation on the air without disclosing his contribution

On the website The Root, civil rights attorney Charles F. Coleman, Jr. contends the violence at the Twin Peaks restaurant in Waco, Texas was covered much differently than the violence a few weeks earlier in Baltimore, Maryland -- and this provides an example of how racism works.

The Des Moines Register sharply criticized Burlington, Des Moines County, and the state of Iowa for concealing information about the January death of Autumn Steele.

The Columbia Journalism Review reported Georgia Governor Nathan Deal touted his administration's ability to get its word out through social media while bypassing traditional media.  What's more, he made the comment during the Centennial Gala for the Grady College of Journalism at the University of Georgia.

Both Jim Romenesko and TV Spy report that David Custer, an anchor at WNEM-TV in Saginaw, Michigan, tweeted a photo intended to spoof the movie Pretty Woman.

The Pew Research Center has released its annual report on the news media. It looks at website usage, TV news ratings, podcast listening, newspaper ad revenue, and more.

The RTDNA reports legislators in at least 18 states are considering measures to regulate public access to video from police body cameras.  Those states include Iowa and Missouri.

Research by a University of Kansas professor found journalism burnout is affecting women more than men.  Burnout factors include exhaustion, cynicism, and a perceived lack of support from their employer.

An RTDNA survey of news outlets found television stations say they are focusing more on investigative reporting.  The Shop Talk panelists consider that surprising.

Rolling Stone magazine last week retracted the story it ran last fall about an alleged gang rape at the University of Virginia.  The retraction was issued after the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism looked into the story (at the magazine’s request) and found numerous flaws.

Many news outlets report on crime.  Some even make regular trips to police stations to check on reports.  The Shop Talk panelists were asked the question: how do you handle it when one of your own reporters is arrested?

The alleged corruption by Congressman Aaron Schock (R-IL) was uncovered through the digging done by reporters.  The Shop Talk panelists say this story demonstrates once again why it's important to have fully funded and staffed newsrooms.

In an article for the RTDNA, former TV news director Forrest Carr refers to this as The Age of Shoddy in journalism.  He wrote that instead of fact checking, New Media advocates think it is okay to report rumors and then check for veracity.

This is the 11th annual Sunshine Week.  It was started as a way of promoting the need for open and transparent government.  It's observed by journalists and many others who keep tabs on public servants.

In an article on the “Take Part” website, Eric Alterman wrote that public relations is killing journalism. Alterman pointed out there are now 4.6 public relations specialists in America for every one reporter. And those p.r. specialists make considerably more money on average than reporters.

The Baltimore Sun reported new Maryland Governor Larry Hogan's lawyer has urged agency heads and staff to stamp a claim of "executive privilege" -- the civilian equivalent of "top secret" -- on all their internal correspondence, emails and documents.

The FAA is now accepting public comments on its proposed regulations for the commercial use of drones.  Interest in the regulation is high among news organizations because drones are considered a potential new tool for reporters. However, it could be a year or more before the regulations are implemented and drones can be used for gathering news.

Stretching the Truth

Feb 17, 2015

The nightly newscasts on the TV networks draw a fraction of the audience they once did, but the fall of NBC lead anchor Brian Williams still sent shock waves through the industry.

Pages