Shop Talk

Tri States Public Radio's weekly round table discussion of media related issues featuring News Director Rich Egger and fellow panelists Jasmine Crighton, News Coordinator for the Western Illinois University Department of Broadcasting, and Rich Moreno, adviser for the Western Courier.

Shop Talk - July 2

Jul 3, 2012

The panelists talk about the possible addition of many more lower power FM (LPFM) stations to the nation's airwaves.

The magazine Current reported the FCC is getting ready to open a filing window for LPFM applications. It would be the first such filing window in more than a decade.

Shop Talk - June 26

Jun 26, 2012

The panelists follow up on last week's discussion about the future of newspapers by talking about the future of public radio.

Minnesota Public Radio journalist Bob Collins questioned in a blog whether public radio is still willing to take risks. He wondered if a program such as A Prairie Home Companion would be given a chance if it were introduced today.

Shop Talk - June 19

Jun 19, 2012

The panelists talk about the New Orleans Times-Picayune's recent decision to cut back to just three print editions per week.  The 175-year old newspaper also handed out pink slips to numerous employees last week.

Panelist Lisa Kernek believes there is a move in the industry toward creating a hybrid between an on-line newspaper and one that's in print. She is saddened by the news out of New Orleans, though she thinks print will not go away.

Shoptalk - June 12

Jun 12, 2012

The panelists talk about the past, present, and future of investigative journalism.

The starting point is the Watergate investigation.  Sunday, June 17, marks the 40th anniversary of the break-in at the Watergate Hotel, which started an investigation that eventually led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon. He is the only American president to resign from office.

Shop Talk - June 5

Jun 5, 2012

The panelists talk about Internet radio. Listenership is up about 8% in the past year.

Panelist Lisa Kernek said she listens for programs that she missed and programs that are not carried in this market.

Kernek said research shows more people are using their cell phones to listen to radio in the car and the numbers are expected to continue growing as more people get smart phones.

Shop Talk - May 29

May 29, 2012

The panelists discuss an apology issued by the Associated Press 67 years after the fact.

AP rebuked and then fired correspondent Edward Kennedy after he reported -- a full day ahead of the competition -- that the Germans had unconditionally surrendered in World War II.  Kennedy was one of 17 reporters who witnessed the surrender ceremony. But in exchange for being allowed to see the ceremony, they were barred from reporting on it until authorized by Allied headquarters.

Shop Talk - May 22

May 22, 2012

The panelists talk about a new requirement regarding the political advertising sold by network television stations in the nation's 50 largest markets.

The FCC board voted to have those stations post certain data on-line. That includes information on who bought political ads, when, and how much they paid.

Broadcasters are already required to file the information at their stations but the board feels it will be more accessible if posted on the web.

Shop Talk - May 15

May 15, 2012

The panelists talk about a federal appeals court ruling on Illinois' eavesdropping law.

The Chicago Tribune reports the Seventh Circuit US Court of Appeals in Chicago found the law “likely violates” the First Amendment. The court ordered authorities to stop enforcing it.

The law made it illegal to audio record police officers in public without their consent. Violators faced harsh prison sentences.

The matter became an issue because of the NATO summit scheduled to be held in Chicago on May 20 & 21, 2012.

Shop Talk - May 8

May 8, 2012

The panelists talk about an article on the CareerCast website, which said newspaper reporter and broadcaster are two of the worst jobs of 2012.

The article said, “As the digital world continues to take over and provide on-demand  information, the need for print newspapers and daily newscasts is diminishing. To be sure, both jobs once seemed glamorous, but on-the-job stress, declining job opportunities and income levels are what landed them on our Worst Jobs list.”

Shop Talk - May 1

May 1, 2012

This week's program is about Bill Knight's career and changes in the news industry. In addition, Lisa Kernek joins the panel to replace Knight.

Knight graduated from WIU, went on to be a reporter, and came back to Western to teach in the early 1990s. He never stopped writing and reporting, and will continue to do commentaries on Tri States Public Radio.

Knight said there have been many changes in the newspaper industry over the years. He said the one creating the biggest impact right now is in management.

Shop Talk - April 24

Apr 24, 2012

The panelists talk about the late Mike Wallace's lament about cable news, which he dismissed as “opinion, gossip, and scandal.”

Wallace said, “News today has become yammer, yammer, yammer. It's infotainment. It used to be a race to the top. To a certain degree news today is a race to the bottom.”

Shop Talk - April 17

Apr 17, 2012

The panelists discuss a policy implemented by Chicago State University. The Chicago Tribune reported CSU told faculty and staff that everything from opinion pieces to social media communications could require prior approval, and that only authorized university personnel could share information with the media.

(Editor's note: CSU rescinded the policy in the time since this program was recorded).

Shop Talk - April 10

Apr 10, 2012

The panelists discuss so-called "ag gag" laws, one of which was recently signed by Iowa Governor Terry Branstad.

The bill makes it a crime to access an agricultural facility under false pretenses.  Illinois and Missouri lawmakers have considered similar legislation.

Critics of the bill say it is too broad because it does not define "false pretenses." Supporters say the law will protect farmers.

The panelists talk about a constitutional amendment in Mexico that would federalize criminal attacks on journalists.

The Citizen Media Law Project reports the amendment was recently approved by the Mexican Senate. It still needs to be approved by more than half of the country's 31 state legislatures. Even if it wins approval, the amendment offers no guidance on how it would be enforced.

Drug cartels have made Mexico one of the most dangerous places in the world for journalists, who are routinely threatened, attacked, or killed if they report on crime.

Shop Talk - March 27

Mar 27, 2012

The panelists discuss legislation in Illinois (SB 3773) requiring charities that receive state money to follow the state's Freedom of Information Act.

Financial statements and e-mails are among the items that would be subject to FOIA requests. Not-for-profits feel the plan would create confusion and burden organizations with extra work. In addition, they point out they are private entities.

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