Shop Talk

Tri States Public Radio's weekly round table discussion of media related issues featuring News Director Rich Egger and fellow panelists Jasmine Crighton, News Coordinator for the Western Illinois University Department of Broadcasting, and Jonathan Ahl, General Manager for TSPR.

Late last month, reporter Steve Majerus-Collins posted an article on his Facebook page explaining that he was quitting his job because, "The owner of my paper is guilty of journalistic misconduct of epic proportions."

Bernard Schoenburg of the State Journal-Register in Springfield reported the Illinois News Network is acquiring the Illinois Radio Network, which provides news reports to stations throughout the state.

It's the season of gift giving, so the Shop Talk crew discusses whether it's appropriate for reporters to accept gifts from the people they cover.

After the FBI finished going through the home of mass murderers Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik, the agency turned the property back over to the landlord. The landlord then opened it up to reporters, some of whom rummaged through the apartment on live television.

Brandon Smith gets credit for forcing the city of Chicago to release video that showed a police officer shooting unarmed teenager Laquan McDonald 16 times.

In an article on its website, RTDNA said it and several other journalism organizations have written an open letter to musicians, calling on them to loosen restrictions on news photographers at concerts.

Demonstrations this month at the University of Missouri led to the resignation of University System President Tim Wolfe.  But the conduct of some protesters also became part of the story when they tried to muscle out reporters who were there to cover the event.

The Republican presidential candidates made demands recently concerning the format of debates and the questions asked.  They want more say over how the forums are handled.

Chris Ivanes joins the Shop Talk panel for this week’s discussion. Ivanes was a high school student in Romania when the Berlin Wall came down on November 9, 1989 and he remembers how the news spread through the Eastern bloc.

A contributing writer to NPR's website was caught plagiarizing.  Instead of trying to cover up the act, NPR posted a story about it. The story spotlights ten examples and includes links to the original material.

Nielsen is known for measuring TV ratings, which helps determine what shows air and how much money networks can charge for ads on programs.

The commercial radio group in Macomb, Regional Media, fired its news director and no longer has anyone covering city hall, police briefing, and other local beats.  While the move might improve the company's bottom line, it does nothing to serve the community it purports to cover.

Recent mass shootings in the U.S. led some journalists to declare they will not report the shooter's name in such cases.  There are concerns that naming a shooter could turn him/her into a celebrity and could inspire copycats.

Columbia Journalism Review recently ran a piece regarding the need for newsrooms to build stronger ties with their communities so they can do a better job determining  what local audiences expect. 

Broadcasting students at Western Illinois University are required to buy a Mac for writing and editing stories.  That got Shop Talk panelist Rich Egger wondering whether students might soon be required to own a smartphone, and if smartphones might be the wave of the future for professionals.

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