Shop Talk

Tri States Public Radio's weekly round table discussion of media related issues featuring News Director Rich Egger, WIU Broadcasting Professor Mike Murray and WIU Jounalism Professor Bill Knight.

The Shop Talk panelists discuss the White House’s decision to limit the amount of access photojournalists have to President Obama.

The Shop Talk panelists begin the new year by talking about new media.

The Shop Talk panelists discuss a website that is seeking crowd-sourced funding for investigative reporting.

The Shop Talk panelists discuss a change of heart by Newsweek magazine.

The Shop Talk panelists discuss whether it’s appropriate for a reporter to hug a news source.

The Shop Talk panelists discuss how Twitter is changing the way news is gathered and disseminated.

The Shop Talk panelists discuss why a news report about same-sex marriage might include video of two men kissing.

The Shop Talk panelists criticize NBC News for paying to gain exclusive rights to stories.

The Shop Talk panelists discuss a study by the Pew Research Center, which found younger Americans are barely increasing their news consumption as they grow older.

The Shop Talk panelists discuss the case of a newspaper sports reporter in Massachusetts who was fired for including in his story a quote that made a couple local schools look bad.

The Shop Talk panelists discuss whether American journalists are doing a good job of reporting on the partial shutdown of the federal government.

The Shop Talk panelists discuss the thinking that goes into the placement of stories on news media websites.

The Shop Talk panelists discuss research that found an increasing number of people feel journalists don’t contribute much to society’s well-being.

The Shop Talk panelists discuss surveys that show men run the vast majority of newsrooms in local radio and TV. The same is true of daily newspapers.

Macomb, IL – The panelists talk about the way the media in general covers the presidential nomination process.

A study by George Mason University found the number of stories about the primaries generally declined in recent decades on the evening network newscasts. It also found the vast majority of stories focus on the "horse race" rather than substantive issues.

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