WIUM Tristates Public Radio

Shop Talk

Tri States Public Radio's weekly round table discussion of media related issues featuring News Director Rich Egger, WIU Broadcasting Professor Mike Murray and WIU Jounalism Professor Bill Knight.

Matt Lauer, Charlie Rose, and Mark Halperin are among the journalists who've lost their jobs after being accused of sexual misconduct in the workplace (such allegations have also affected the NPR newsroom).  The Shop Talk panelists discuss the issue during this week's program.

The Washington Post recently caught the group Project Veritas trying to pull off a scam on its reporters.  Project Veritas claims to be exposing the world for what it is, but the Shop Talk panelists don't see it that way.

The Shop Talk panelists talk about some of the issues that confronted journalists during the past year and their concerns for the profession as the new year approaches.

Wednesday, November 22 marked the 54th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.  So the Shop Talk panelists stepped back in history to take a look at that weekend in 1963 from a journalist's perspective. 

When reporters and editors at DNAinfo-Gothamist voted to join a union, owner Joe Ricketts shut down the operation, which had newsrooms in New York City and Chicago.  All of the organization's content was removed from the web initially, though it was later restored.

A group called the Coalition to Save Local Media formed specifically to oppose the Sinclair Broadcast Group's proposed purchase of Tribune Media for $3.9 billion.  The Coalition contends the merger would hurt consumers by increasing prices while at the same time decreasing choices for local content.

Fake News is No Treat

Oct 31, 2017

On this Halloween edition of Shop Talk, the panelists say the concept of "fake news" is one of the scariest things happening to journalism today.

Shop Talk panelist Jasmine Crighton feels product placement during newscasts has gotten out of hand.  She said the wall between news and sales has gotten so thin that you can see through it.

Who is a Journalist?

Oct 18, 2017

A list of journalists arrested in the U.S. this year shows some are from well-known outlets such as the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Getty Images. Others are independent and freelance journalists, which got the Shop Talk crew wondering how to determine who qualifies to be called a journalist.

Mark Twain deserves credit for the quote used in the headline, while journalists who report on someone's demise before it's confirmed discredit their industry.

The Associated Press reported that government bodies are increasingly turning the tables on citizens who seek public records that might be embarrassing or legally sensitive. Instead of granting or denying their requests, a growing number of school districts, municipalities, and state agencies have filed lawsuits against people making the requests.

The Poynter Institute reported on a project called Report for America that aims to place 1,000 journalists in local newsrooms in the next five years. According to Poynter, this is how RFA will work: 

Frontline, the outstanding public television documentary program, will do some audio-only documentaries as podcasts. The magazine Current reported on the story. Program producers told the magazine certain stories are meant to be told in the audio format rather than video. 

The problems caused by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma have been well-covered in the media.  Meanwhile, wildfires have also caused destruction in parts of the U.S. but have not received as much coverage.

The Shop Talk panelists this week discuss news coverage of Hurricane Harvey and what it's like to report on a disaster.

RTDNA recently ran a column from a contributor who recommends every reporter have a blog.  The author of the piece wrote that it's a chance for reporters to keep their creative writing skills sharp, given that a lot of news writing is churned out to ensure there is content for newscasts.

In the Washington Post, media columnist Margaret Sullivan wrote about what she called the false equivalency presidency of Donald Trump.  She wrote, "During the 2016 presidential campaign, the national news media's misguided sense of fairness helped equate the serious flaws of Hillary Clinton with the disqualifying evils of Donald Trump."

Al Tompkins and Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute say they've both covered hate groups and they're offering some advice for journalists.  They shared their thoughts in an article that's the subject of this week's Shop Talk.

MarketWatch reported that a survey by the Reynolds Journalism Institute at the University of Missouri found The Economist is the most trusted news source in the U.S.  Other news organizations that fared well in the survey include NPR, Reuters, the BBC, and The Wall Street Journal.

Keeping It Civil

Aug 1, 2017

A recent case of animal cruelty in western Illinois sparked an onslaught of angry social media comments on the websites for some news organizations.  People called for all manner of retribution against the person accused of the crime. A television station felt compelled to post a piece urging people to show some restraint and not become an online lynch mob.

The Peoria Journal Star recently ran an article about changes in local TV newsrooms.  The piece quoted a member of management at one station who took young journalists to task.

The Poynter Institute reported on an appeals court ruling that found it is lawful for journalists and members of the public to video record police in public places. Journalism groups considered it a First Amendment issue.

A couple high profile defamation cases were back in the news during the latter half of June. One involved a lawsuit against ABC News. The other suit concerned Rolling Stone magazine.

The White House recently adopted what's described as a "screw the media" strategy to make it more difficult for journalists to do their jobs.  And the U.S. Senate took action to reduce media access to its members.

A recent commentary in the Columbia Journalism Review calls non-compete contracts "a silent scourge creeping around newsrooms."  The author argues such contracts might help corporate executives but do absolutely nothing for the reporters who are required to sign them.

The FCC has proposed eliminating the main studio rule, which requires AM, FM, and TV stations to have a studio in or near the community they serve and to have a locally staffed office.

A recent TV News Check column suggests it's time to get rid of the "sweeps" ratings periods held in television four times a year.  The writer believes local newscasts should strive to deliver great reporting throughout the year instead of holding the best pieces for sweeps periods, which are used to set ad rates.

The National Press Club, the RTDNA, the Society of Professional Journalists, and nine other journalism groups say it's time to tone down the anti-news media rhetoric.  In particular they're calling out those in public office.

Visionary or Pariah?

May 23, 2017

Roger Ailes, the former Chairman and CEO of Fox News, died May 18.  Depending on who you talk to, he's either praised for turning Fox News into a powerhouse that gave conservatives a major presence on cable television news or blamed for damaging journalism and civil discourse.

The Shop Talk panelists touch on several issues this week: Sinclair Broadcast Group's acquisition of more TV stations, layoffs at an Illinois newspaper, and the layoff notice given to a broadcast news educator.

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