Science

The Two-Way
3:30 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

In The Name Of Science, Head-Bobbing Sea Lion Keeps The Beat

Ronan, a 3-year-old female sea lion, has learned to keep a beat, something researchers previously thought was tied to vocal mimicry.
Screengrab via YouTube

While rhythm can often be hard enough to find among humans, finding it in the animal kingdom has been even more rare.

But thanks to a 3-year-old sea lion named Ronan who knows how to keep the beat, previous notions of rhythmic ability among animals are now being challenged.

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Research News
3:30 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

Brain Mapping Project Could Help Find Cures For Alzheimer's, Epilepsy

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 1:28 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Today, President Obama announced a new $100 million initiative to map the human brain. NPR's Mara Liasson reports the White House is predicting the project could eventually help find cures for diseases like epilepsy and Alzheimer's.

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Shots - Health News
2:55 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

Could Wind Turbines Be Toxic To The Ear?

A maintenance worker looks out over an off-shore wind farm in Liverpool, England in 2008. Some people are concerned about the potential health effects of noise from wind turbines.
Christopher Furlong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 10:18 am

The U.S. is embracing wind energy, with wind turbines making up half of the new electricity added to the power grid last year. But a smattering of people who live near the turbines say they're a nuisance — and making them ill.

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The Two-Way
1:41 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

DNA-Mapped Furniture Really Ties The Room Together — With You

The Darwin Table is created from a person's unique DNA profile.
Tjep. via Wired Magazine

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 2:53 pm

Furnishing a new apartment or house can be tough; sometimes you just can't find that end table or couch that is uniquely "you."

Well, as Wired reports, a Dutch design studio is trying to change that.

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The Salt
1:29 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

Fruit, Not Fries: Lunchroom Makeovers Nudge Kids Toward Better Choices

Students select blueberries and rolls from the food line at Lincoln Elementary in Olympia, Wash., in 2004.
John Froschauer AP

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 3:49 pm

Gone are the days of serving up tater tots and French toast sticks to students. Here are the days of carrot sticks and quinoa.

New nutritional guidelines, announced in 2012, require public school lunchrooms to offer more whole grains, low-fat milk and fewer starchy sides like french fries. But short of stationing grandmothers in every cafeteria, how do you ensure that students actually eat the fruits and veggies they're being offered?

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