Science

Space
3:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

To Put Two Rovers On Mars, Scientists Had To Get Clever With Packing

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 6:01 pm

To fit in their shipping container, two Mars rovers had to be folded up into a tiny package and then unfolded — a prime example of what NPR science correspondent Joe Palca calls "unfolding science."

The Two-Way
7:15 am
Sat June 7, 2014

Photos: After A Storm, A Red Sky, Double Rainbow Over Atlanta

The sky turns pink as a rainbow appears at dusk over the suburbs during a thunderstorm on Thursday.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 10:48 am

We're a bit late to this. But it's so stunning, we'll share it anyway: Thursday night, the remnants of a strong storm and a sunset came together at just the right time to form a beautiful celestial treat: a red sky, double rainbow spanning the city of Atlanta.

Associated Press photographer David Goldman captured the rainbow from the suburbs, where the sky looked pink:

But a couple of others took shots of the rainbow over downtown ATL, where reds mixed with purples. Here are the shots:

Update at 10:10 a.m. ET. Science:

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The Salt
4:41 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

Doughnut Day Downer: Palm Oil In Pastries Drives Deforestation

Doughnuts at a Krispy Kreme store in Washington, D.C. An environmental coalition says leading doughnut companies like Krispy Kreme source palm oil from suppliers who are clear-cutting rain forests and destroying wildlife habitat.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 6:29 pm

On National Doughnut Day, it's hard to imagine how our love of doughnuts might be contributing to deforestation halfway around the globe.

But here's the connection: You know that oily smudge left on your fingers after you polish off a doughnut? That's not just sugar. It's also palm oil.

The major doughnut retailers — from Dunkin' Donuts to Tim Hortons and Krispy Kreme — fry their sweet treats in palm oil, or in blends of oil that include palm oil.

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The Two-Way
4:37 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

New Look At Apollo Rocks Finds Evidence Of Moon's Birth

An Apollo 12 astronaut makes footprints on the surface of the moon, Nov. 19, 1969. Rocks collected on the mission were among those recently re-examined by a team of German astronauts.
AP

A new analysis of rocks collected by Apollo astronauts on the moon more than 40 years ago bolsters the leading theory of our natural satellite's origin — that it formed from a collision between a nascent Earth and another object some 4.5 billion years ago.

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The Salt
11:27 am
Fri June 6, 2014

Can Farmed Fish Feed The World Without Destroying The Environment?

Carp are collected at a breeding farm near the Belarus village of Ozerny in November 2013. Researchers say there's a lot the aquaculture industry can do to be more efficient.
Viktor Drachev AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:19 am

We Americans love our fried shrimp, our sushi and our fish sticks. And a lot of other people around the world count on fish as a critical part of their diet, too. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization, fish now accounts for almost 17 percent of the world's intake of protein — in some coastal and island countries it's as high as 70 percent.

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