WIUM Tristates Public Radio

President Barack Obama

The Shop Talk panelists discuss the troubling trend of the White House trying to control the stories written by journalists.

The panelists discuss the poor treatment student journalists sometimes receive from news makers, and how it’s symptomatic of a larger problem.

  A legislative committee Wednesday voted to authorize spending $100 million to lure Barack Obama's presidential library to Chicago ... for the second time.

Before he became President, Barack Obama served as an Illinois state senator and a U.S. senator. He worked as a community organizer in Chicago, and taught at the University of Chicago law school.

All reasons he might locate his presidential library and museum in Illinois.

But New York and Hawaii are also in the running.

Illinois legislators will vote a second time on a plan to spend $100 million to help lure Barack Obama's Presidential Library and Museum to Chicago, following a controversy.

A lesson in politics: Whichever party is in charge can often use the rules to its advantage. Like last week, when the Obama library proposal passed out of a Democratic-controlled House committee with nine votes ... even though only five representatives were there. Republicans had skipped the hearing, and many say they're opposed to spending the money given Illinois' financial situation.

President Obama: Middle Class Plan

Jul 24, 2013
Chris Lovingood

The president started by linking his remarks to a speech he also gave at Knox College just after he was elected Senator.

peterbergen.com

This week on Emphasis, Rich Egger’s guest is journalist and national security expert Peter Bergen. His latest book is Manhunt: The Ten Year Search for bin Laden – From 9/11 to Abbottabad.

As tempting as it is to blame a U.S. President for insufficient job growth – whether Barack Obama or George W. Bush – jobs come from employers, not politicians. Sure, White House leadership is important, ideas from the executive branch should spur government action to help businesses hire, and a president sets an administration’s tone. But presidents can’t exclusively take the blame – or the credit – for jobs.