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Macomb's Courthouse Square

Looking For Government That Works? Try Local

Sep 27, 2017
Rich Egger

I doubt that many people would disagree with me when I say big governments – those in  Washington DC and Springfield -  have not been working very well in the past few years.  Washington and Springfield seem to have a very difficult time doing anything. 

drone photo taken by Chad Sperry / City of Macomb shared the image with TSPR

A major summer construction project has just wrapped up in downtown Macomb and the city is already looking ahead to possibly making more improvements in a couple of years.

Baylee Brynteson

Last year's sculptures are gone and eight new ones have taken their places around Macomb's downtown area. Downtown Development Director Kristen Terry said the debut of the outdoor exhibit last year was a huge success, drawing people from out of town to the downtown.

Tspr's Emily boyer

The Go West bus system in Macomb will avoid the historic courthouse square this summer as major road work is underway to give the square a facelift.

Tri States Public Radio

Macomb's downtown square will soon have a new parking layout that isn't all that new. Nearly two years ago, the city took out an interior row of parking spaces after removing a parking median that divided the inner and outer lanes on the Macomb courthouse square.

Emily Boyer

Macomb's $4.3-million plan for improving the downtown square hinged on the city securing an Illinois Department of Transportation grant to fund about half the project. But the state money is not coming through, so city leaders are considering their options.

Macomb Residents Trying to Perfect the Art of Photography

Jul 25, 2016
Crystal Kepple

Members of the Macomb Camera Club  go on outings and attend events, capturing the beauty of their town and the region with their cameras.  Members include those who are retired and joined to keep busy doing what they love, as well as those just getting started, having recently discovered a love for the craft.

Celebrating Monopoly's Ties to Macomb

Mar 28, 2016
Breanna Descourouez

The original Monopoly game, called The Landlords Game, was created by a Macomb native, Elizabeth "Lizzy" Magie.  To honor that connection, Adam Kozlowski, owner of the Kozmic Game Emporium in downtown Macomb, is holding the first "Lizzy Magie Design A Board Game Contest."

An Art and Gift Market in Macomb will feature locally produced works in a variety of mediums: photography, jewelry, yarn crafts, wearables, upcycled art, and more.

Macomb Shop Embracing Board Game Resurgence

Aug 17, 2015
Credit Marty E. on Flickr (flickr.com/calboy2)

Since it opened its doors last September, The Kozmic Game Emporium in Macomb's downtown has offered a new and unique social opportunity. And as the shop gains more attention, its free game nights are gaining traction. 

TSPR's Emily Boyer

A proposed $3.5 million downtown revitalization project is on hold due to a delay in securing state funding. But Macomb won't wait to make at least one modification to the courthouse square.

Macomb's new downtown development director has been on the job less than two months and is already laying out her plans to strengthen the courthouse square. Andrea Keene sees her role as being an advocate for merchants on the square.

TSPR'S Emily Boyer

Construction work is getting underway for a much anticipated public works project in Macomb. Meanwhile, delays in state and federal funding are forcing the city to reorganize some of its other infrastructure plans.

Rich Egger

The city hoped to pay for a multi-million dollar facelift to the courthouse square with local sales tax revenue and a state grant.  But it appears the state grant program won’t be offering money for at least another year.

MacombPaynes / Flickr Creative Commons

Plans to revitalize Macomb’s downtown square will soon be sent to the Illinois Department of Transportation for review. The city hopes to get grant money from the state to help pay for $3.5-million worth of upgrades.

Rich Egger

A person who’s spent much of her life in the Macomb area will be responsible for breathing new life into the city’s downtown.  The city hired Andrea Keene to be the Director of Downtown Development.

Rich Egger

The annual Christmas event in downtown Macomb is designed to evoke the look and feel of Victorian England.

Rich Egger

Some Macomb aldermen question whether enough is being done to fill empty storefronts on the courthouse square.

Rich Egger

Macomb Community Development Coordinator Ed Basch said the job always kept him on his toes during his nearly seven years with the city.

Rich Egger

The basic concept for Macomb’s downtown revitalization plan is now in place.

Macomb Aldermen Want Downtown Work ASAP

Jul 11, 2013
Rich Egger

A few different timelines have been proposed for renovations to the Macomb Courthouse Square Historic District.

Rich Egger

Macomb city leaders anticipate numerous benefits for the downtown area now that it’s been added to the National Register of Historic Places by the federal government.

Rich Egger

Three concepts have emerged thus far as Macomb considers possible changes to the look of its downtown square.

Rich Egger

Macomb is on the verge of having its courthouse square declared a national historic district.

The Illinois Historic Sites Advisory Council has recommended the designation to the federal government, which almost always follows the state panel’s suggestion.

However, Mayor Mike Inman said the city won’t begin preparing signs or making plans just yet.

Inman believes it will be 60 to 90 days before the city learns of the federal government’s decision.

Rich Egger

The long process of adding Macomb’s downtown district to the National Historic Register is about to come to an end.

The Illinois Historic Sites Advisory Council will meet February 22 in Springfield to consider the city’s application. Its recommendation will be sent to the National Park Service, which almost always follows the council’s suggestion.

It could be May before the park service makes the official announcement.

Historic Consultant Victoria Granacki, who’s been helping Macomb with its application, likes the city’s chances.

Rich Egger

Engineering firms have until January 17 to make their case for getting involved with Macomb’s downtown revitalization project.

The city is soliciting “Request for Qualifications” from consultants. Community Development Director Ed Basch told aldermen the city prefers to hire a firm with experience in downstate Illinois.

Curtis Bisbee

Macomb is getting ready to work on its courthouse square. Repairs will be made to the streets and possibly the infrastructure underneath. The project gives the city, businesses, and residents a rare opportunity to re-examine the square and ensure it remains vibrant for decades to come.

Rich Egger

Those who own property in Macomb’s downtown historic district will be receiving a phone call from the city.

Community Development Coordinator Ed Basch told aldermen the district has been in place for more than two years so he believes it’s time for some feedback from those most directly impacted.

Basch thinks a phone survey will result in more responses than a mailed or web-based questionnaire. He said it’s a short survey of five questions.

Rich Egger

Once upon a time, browsing through a book or record store was one of life’s simple pleasures. But now many people prefer to browse on-line, which is making it more difficult for independent stores to remain in business, especially in small towns.

But there are independent stores that are finding ways to keep the doors open. One example is Stone Alley Books & Collectibles in Galesburg. Owner Ben “Stone” Stomberg said he once sold comics on-line. But when the Walden Bookstore in town closed, he got a loan and a grant from the city and set up shop on Seminary Street.

Rich Egger

Macomb is in the process of lining up the financing for its multi-year street repair program.

The goal is to have all the financial paperwork and the bond sale completed by October 1. Construction won't start until next spring but Mayor Mike Inman said the money is needed sooner because there is plenty to do between now and then.

“We're going to incur some engineering costs. These are not projects that are sitting on a shelf ready to roll. We're going to have some significant costs,” said Inman.

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