livestock agriculture

(Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media)

All week, Harvest Public Media's series Choice Cuts: Meat In America is examining how the meat industry is changing the U.S. food system and the American diet.

One of the most important tools of modern medicine is in jeopardy. In the 20th century, antibiotics turned once-lethal infections into manageable diseases. They also contributed to the transformation of meat production in America.

Abby Wendle

All week, Harvest Public Media's series Choice Cuts: Meat In America is examining how the meat industry is changing the U.S. food system and the American diet.

Drive down a dirt road, a two-lane country highway, even many Interstates in the Midwest and the view out the window is likely to get monotonous: massive fields filled with acres of corn sprawled in all directions.

(Courtesy NET Television)

All week, Harvest Public Media's series Choice Cuts: Meat In America is examining how the meat industry is changing the U.S. food system and the American diet.

Americans have a big appetite for everything meat. We smoke it, grill it, slice it, and chop it.  The typical American puts away around 200 pounds of beef, pork, and poultry every year . That's true in many of the wealthiest countries. But developing countries are showing a growing appetite for meat.

"Stud Dames" Spread U.S. Cow Genetics Far and Wide

May 18, 2015
Abby Wendle

Panda, standing six feet tall and weighing almost a ton, is everything a show cow should be: broad-backed and round-rumped, with sturdy legs holding up her heft. Her hide -- thick and black, with splotches of creamy white -- fits her name.  "She's a big time cow," said Dan Byers, owner of Byers Premium Cattle, Inc. "She's a freak of nature is what she is."

The Proposed Spending Bill's Impact on Ag

Dec 17, 2014
Flickr

Congress' $1.1-trillion spending bill is on the way to President Obama's desk.

Harvest Public Media

As recently reported, Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea killed millions of piglets in 27 states this year. Possibly originating in China, Iowa farmers were hurt the worst.

Rich Egger

Beware if you've ever considered moving near a farm in Illinois. A new decision by the Illinois Supreme Court reaffirms a state law that blocks nuisance lawsuits against farmers.

The case involves the Roger and Bobbie Toftoy, who moved into a new house across from a cattle farm. They found the flies to be so bad that they sometimes could not go outside.

They sued and won, and a judge told the farmers to fix the problem. But on appeal, the cattlemen argued they were protected under an Illinois law meant to encourage farming.

Photo from the Illinois General Assembly website

Recording at a farm or livestock facility without the permission of the owner would be illegal under a proposal in the Illinois House.

Representative Jim Sacia (R-Winnebago County) sponsored the measure (HB 5143). He said farmers know what's best for their animals.