Keokuk City Council

Mayor Requesting Penalty $$$

Nov 19, 2012

Keokuk is looking to benefit from a penalty to a local company.

Keokuk Maintains Concert Hours

Nov 1, 2012

The Keokuk City Council will not be changing the hours of outdoor concerts.

Keokuk is ready to address some apparent noise problems.

The Keokuk City Council has received multiple complaints about outdoor concerts at L-Treyn’s Bar and Grill over the last few years.

The panel’s only response, though, occurred in May 2011 when it required outdoor concerts end at 1:00 A.M. at all establishments where alcohol is sold.

The issue resurfaced during Thursday night’s workshop.

The result was 3rd Ward Alderman Ron Payne proposing the concerts end by either 10:00 P.M. or 11:00 P.M., depending on the night.

Navigating a short stretch of Middle Road, between Keokuk High School and the student parking lot, can be very difficult after school or during special events.

Principal Larry Frakes says parents and visitors pull their vehicles into areas where parking is prohibited and leave them for extended periods of time.

He told the city council, Thursday night, that it has reached the point where a student was recently struck by a vehicle while crossing the street.

The Keokuk City Council says it needs more information before deciding what type of animal can be considered a pet.

The Keokuk City Council could decide what how to classify certain animals next week.

The idea of re-installing Keokuk’s old rocket slide could gain some momentum in the coming weeks and months.

The Keokuk City Council is finalizing the details for its second urban deer season.

Angelica Finch says even though her family has only owned "Bacon" for a few weeks, he has become part of the family.

"Bacon" is a two-month-old miniature pot-belly pig given to Finch's five-year-old daughter as a birthday present.

Finch says she did not know that pot-belly pigs were prohibited in Keokuk until the animal control officer told her he had received a complaint from a neighbor about "Bacon."

That prompted Finch to ask the Keokuk City Council to change city law to include pot-belly pigs as domestic animals, similar to cats and dogs.

It appears Keokuk is ready to move ahead with a large-scale street reconstruction project.

Several years ago, the city borrowed about $3-million to rebuild Grand Avenue, from 4th Street to Rand Park.

The bids came in much higher than that, though, so the city had to repay the loan, with interest, and put the project on the shelf.

Talk of rebuilding Grand Avenue has resurfaced in recent weeks, culminating in last night’s Keokuk City Council workshop.

Keokuk will no longer need outside help to settle a new contract with some employees.

Mayor Tom Marion says that’s because the city and the general unit have reached a tentative agreement.

The employees in the general unit come from multiple departments, including streets and parks.  They have been working under their previous contract since July 1.

Marion says the tentative agreement allowed the two sides to cancel an arbitration hearing scheduled for this week.

The Keokuk City Council will help fund the Southeast Iowa Regional Economic and Port Authority (SIREPA).

Keokuk, Fort Madison and Lee County are the original members of the authority, which is Iowa’s first and only port authority.

The Lee County Economic Development Group has been providing operational and administrative services for SIREPA, but the organization now wants to hire the Southeast Iowa Regional Planning Commission.

The authority does not have a regular income stream at this point, so it needs help to pay for such services.

One member of the Keokuk City Council wants residents to address a growing nuisance.

City code requires residents to trim their trees so they do not block sidewalks or extend out over city streets.  The excessive limbs can damage larger vehicles like fire engines and garbage trucks.

1st Ward Alderman Mike O’Connor says there are too many properties, throughout Keokuk, where the trees are out of control.

He wants to put the entire city “on notice” to deal with these overgrown trees.

Keokuk is putting more money into tourism efforts as the city council has agreed to boost funding for the Convention and Tourism Bureau by $7,000.

The increase would bring the total for the current fiscal year to $140,000.

Tourism Director Kirk Brandenberger requested the increase based on Keokuk’s last fiscal year being its best ever when it comes to hotel-motel tax revenue.

He says the tax generated $276,000, which is up from the projected total of $260,000.

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