John Hallwas

Rich Egger

Two tours of Oakwood Cemetery in Macomb will be held on Memorial Day with a focus on local military figures.

Rich Egger

Even a cemetery can use a little love sometimes, and the group "Friends of Oakwood Cemetery" plans to put a little love into the grand old graveyard in Macomb.

“Kelly” Wagle lived a charmed life. In the 1920s he had become successful as a bootlegger in Colchester which was “dry” for much of the decade. He had escaped the clutches of the law many times.

He left Brent's Restaurant and started to walk the two blocks to his home. An assassin pulled up in a Ford coupe and fired three shotgun blasts that ended Wagle's charmed life. Wagle died at 9:15 p.m. April 8, 1929.

Documentary filmaker Ryan Walker has been fascinated by Wagle's sordid story.

Emphasis - June 15

Jun 15, 2012

Rich Egger's guests are author and historian John Hallwas and former Macomb Mayor Bob Anstine. They talk about the city's annual Heritage Days celebration, which takes place Thursday, June 21 - Sunday, June 24.

Heritage Days began during Anstine's administration. He thinks the first one was held in 1981.

“We were looking for an annual activity. We came up with this concept - the city city council, the Chamber of Commerce, and others - and that's when it started,” Anstine said.

Rich Egger

Historian and author John Hallwas was looking for a different take on Macomb's history. He found it by going through its grandest old graveyard, which is Oakwood Cemetery.

The result is the book Here to Stay: Reflections on the Dead in a Small Town Cemetery. It will be released in the coming days.

“Cemeteries are like huge puzzles. The more time you spend strolling through them, noticing things ... there are many mysteries in the cemetery,” Hallwas said. “The cemetery is a big vast canvas of mysteries.”

Emphasis - February 3

Feb 3, 2012

Rich Egger's guests are author and historian John Hallwas and University Television's Roger Kent. They talk about the new series “Macomb's Historic Homes,” which UTV will begin showing on February 6.

Hallwas said they wanted to take a different approach to Macomb's history, and did so by focusing on residential life from through the years.