WIUM Tristates Public Radio

Jessica Reznicek

Jason Parrott / TSPR

Hundreds of people from across the country traveled to Lee County, Iowa during the past two months to try to stop the construction of a crude oil pipeline through four Midwest states. It now appears that effort is over and demonstrators are moving on to other locations.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

Opponents of the Dakota Access crude oil pipeline have maintained an around-the-clock encampment for several weeks in a ditch near one of the construction sites in Lee County. That could be coming to an end following the issuance of an eviction notice.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

The around-the-clock encampment near the site in Lee County where the Dakota Access pipeline will cross the Mississippi River swelled to more than 250 people last Saturday morning and afternoon. Opponents of the pipeline said even more people are needed if they are going to permanently halt construction.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

Public opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline is growing in the tri states region, be it through marches or vigils.   Pipeline opponents hope that continues this weekend when their efforts move to the next step: civil disobedience.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

Jessica Reznicek, 35, of Des Moines arrived in Lee County about two weeks ago. Since then, she has made herself known to the region as a supporter of the Mississippi River and an opponent of the Dakota Access crude oil pipeline.