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Petra Henderson was the designated driver on a bar crawl with her husband. But after the last stop of the night, she says he jumped on her Harley and offered a choice: get on the back or walk home.

A referendum that would have asked voters to change Illinois' redistricting process was rejected by an Illinois court Wednesday. However, members of the group Independent Maps said they will appeal to the state supreme court.

The Illinois Supreme Court will be asked to re-visit an opinion it just issued March 24. State employees' salaries are at stake. 

The Illinois Supreme Court is taking on another pension case, six months after justices unanimously tossed out the state's landmark pension law. Tuesday they heard arguments as to whether a law affecting thousands of City of Chicago employees is constitutional or not.

The Illinois Supreme Court has once again ruled in favor of tobacco giant Philip Morris. The decision, announced Wednesday, saves the company from a $10.1 billion judgment.

Illinois might not be done with the 2013 law reducing state employees’ pensions. Attorney General Lisa Madigan appears to be preparing an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

It took legislators years of talking about Illinois' pension problem before they did much about it. There was a 2011 law that affects state employees, university professors, and public school teachers hired after that time. Then in 2013 they passed a law that reduced current workers' and retirees' benefits. Nearly immediately, workers and their unions sued, calling the law unconstitutional.

There's a reason analysts say Illinois has the nation's lowest credit rating. It has the nation's largest unfunded pension liability. A 2013 law that’s facing a challenge before the Illinois Supreme Court is intended to help.

Illinois is facing a budget hole in the billions, thanks to a rollback of the income tax. If the high court tosses out the pension law, there'll be more fiscal pressure.

Analysts like Moody's Ted Hampton say the rating won't likely drop further, even if the justices toss the law because the rating already presumes the law cannot be implemented.

The Illinois Supreme Court has opened its doors for a special evening session tonight. The justices want Gov. Bruce Rauner and other legislators to meet and watch as they hear a case. 

Chief Justice Rita Garman says in a news release that she wants to give lawmakers a window into the system's essential checks and balances. 

Rauner's office announced that he will attend the session, beginning at 6:20 p.m.

The many years legislators spent crafting a measure to rein in the state's pension costs came to a head yesterday in 52-and-a-half minute hearing before the Illinois Supreme Court. It's now up to the seven justices whether a law that reduces employees' and retirees' benefits is constitutional.

Even before then-Gov. Pat Quinn signed the pension overhaul into law just over a year ago, everyone knew it would come to this.

McDonough County Sheriff's Department

The Illinois Supreme Court said there is sufficient evidence to convict a McDonough County man of killing a young child.

Wiki Commons

The Illinois Supreme Court is reviewing arguments over whether a McDonough County man should get a third trial in the death of a young girl.

  Since the Illinois Supreme Court struck down the state's eavesdropping law in March, it's been legal to record audio of someone without asking permission. But legislators are working on a replacement.

The Supreme Court found the old law overly broad. It was a crime even to record in public, where people shouldn't really have an expectation of privacy. Because of that, Illinois' law was considered one of the strictest in the nation.

The Shop Talk panelists discuss Illinois’ eavesdropping law, which was just declared unconstitutional by the Illinois Supreme Court.

The Illinois Supreme Court is clamping down on a certain type of car insurance policy.

Top Judge in Illinois Stepping Down

Oct 25, 2013
Rich Egger

The Illinois court system will get a new leader next week.

Rich Egger

The Illinois Supreme Court struck down the so-called "Amazon tax."

cmsny.org

The Illinois Supreme Court has paved the way for a long-dormant abortion law to finally go into effect.

Legal Trailblazer Mary Ann McMorrow Passes Away

Feb 25, 2013
Illinois Supreme Court

The first woman to serve on the Illinois Supreme Court has died. Mary Ann McMorrow was 83.

McMorrow's election to the Illinois Supreme Court in 1992 was just one of a series of achievements in a career that spanned more than 50 years.

She was the only woman in her law school class in the early 1950s. After that, she was the first woman to prosecute felonies in Cook County.

One of her colleagues back then was future governor Jim Thompson, who recalled their work together in an interview in 2006, when McMorrow retired from the Supreme Court.

Rich Egger

Beware if you've ever considered moving near a farm in Illinois. A new decision by the Illinois Supreme Court reaffirms a state law that blocks nuisance lawsuits against farmers.

The case involves the Roger and Bobbie Toftoy, who moved into a new house across from a cattle farm. They found the flies to be so bad that they sometimes could not go outside.

They sued and won, and a judge told the farmers to fix the problem. But on appeal, the cattlemen argued they were protected under an Illinois law meant to encourage farming.

State of Illinois

The Illinois Supreme Court ruled a school district that suspended a teacher because of allegations of sexual misconduct had a duty to warn another district where  the teacher later found work.

Jon  White was twice suspended from his teaching job in Normal. But the  McLean County school district did not disclose that when the Urbana  schools asked to verify White's employment.

White was eventually convicted of abusing eight girls in Urbana and two  in  Normal. He will spend most of the next 30 years in prison.

The Illinois Supreme Court has issued a ruling that says police can pull someone  over for a DUI stop even if the driver drifts only slightly out  of his/her lane.

The case dates back to 2008, when a Will County Sheriff's deputy saw Dennis Hackett twice move his car from the left lane "slightly" into the right lane.

The deputy pulled over Hackett and arrested him on drunken driving charges.

The state Supreme Court tossed out the lawsuit filed by Illinois Republicans, who challenged the new map of legislative districts.  The decision was issued Thursday, June 7.

The GOP  said Democrats drew the borders so the district territories would benefit Democratic candidates -- in effect, diluting the Republican vote.

State Democrats charged the lawsuit was too little, too late. The GOP waited until just six weeks before the March primary to file it.

Jurors in Illinois could soon take a more active role in certain types of cases.

The Illinois Supreme Court adopted a rule that said jurors can ask questions of witnesses in civil trials.

Warren Wolfson, who teaches at the DePaul Law School in Chicago and previously served 34 years as a judge, said he allowed questions in more than two dozen cases, but had little success convincing other judges to give it a try.

It should be common sense that lying to police can get you in trouble. But an Illinois Supreme Court ruling says it can actually be a crime.

The case dates back to April 2007, when a LaSalle County Sheriff's deputy thought he recognized someone driving on a suspended license.

He got in his car and followed the woman home, but by the time he got there she was already going inside.

The panelists discuss a pair of plans to bring greater transparency to Illinois government.

One allows cameras and microphones in the state's trial courtrooms. Illinois Supreme Court Chief Justice Thomas Kilbride announced late last month he will allow the technology to be used on an experimental basis. The Illinois News Broadcaster's Association and other media groups have said for many years that this would be a way to improve coverage of the judicial system.

The Illinois Supreme Court said it will allow cameras into trial courtrooms.

Illinois was in the minority of states in not allowing broadcast media to cover trials.

Illinois Supreme Court Chief Justice Thomas Kilbride said Illinois media outlets will have to follow several pages of rules. Even then, there is no guarantee the technology will be allowed for all trials. The state's 23 circuit courts can decide if they want to allow cameras and microphones.

Wikipedia

The  Illinois Supreme Court heard arguments this week in a case challenging  Cook County's ban on assault weapons.

Three gun owners say  they're law-abiding citizens and only use their firearms for recreation  and self-defense.

Edward  Ronkowski represents the men.  He told the justices the law was too  broad, and gave an example  of someone buying a rifle. The owner could  make sure he was in  compliance with the ordinance by verifying the gun  would accept  only a four-round clip.