Illinois pension reform

Pensions
9:52 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Unions Hint Lawmakers Missed Chance To Negotiate Pensions

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 6:10 am

Legislators passed a law overhauling the state's retirement systems. Soaring pension debt remains a concern. The law's constitutionality is also in question. It reduces workers' and retirees' benefits, and raises the retirement age.

Read more
Letting It Play Out in Court
10:26 am
Sun July 27, 2014

AFSCME Now Less Likely to Negotiate on Pensions

The Illinois Capitol building

Illinois lawmakers hope to have a second shot at reaching a compromise with public employees over pensions, but the unions are pinning their hopes on the court system.

Read more
State Supreme Court Ruling
1:19 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Illinois Constitution Protects Retiree Health Insurance

The Illinois Supreme Court says the free health insurance enjoyed by state retirees is protected by the Illinois Constitution.

Read more
Illinois Pension Overhaul Lawsuit
6:48 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Pension Decision Will Wait Until At Least December

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 10:41 am

  It could be December before a judge decides on the legality of Illinois' pension overhaul law for at least another five months. Attorneys met Thursday in Sangamon County Court and agreed on a timeline for the case.

Current and retired state employees, teachers and university workers are suing Gov. Pat Quinn over the pension overhaul passed by the General Assembly late last year.

Read more
Illinois Legislature
7:13 am
Mon June 2, 2014

General Assembly Adjourns With Much Undone

House Speaker Michael Madigan addresses his colleagues at the close of the Illinois General Assembly's spring session.

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 2:45 am

The General Assembly finished its legislative session shortly after midnight Saturday, approving a billion-dollar road construction program.

Democrats started the session with an ambitious agenda: raise the minimum wage, boost college assistance for low-income students, maybe even change Illinois' flat tax into a graduated one. In the end, none of that happened.

Read more

Pages