WIUM Tristates Public Radio

Hillary Clinton

Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

With the legal battle raging over the implementation of controversial Obama Administration clean water rules, the next president will likely face the daunting task of formulating a comprehensive plan to cut-down on water pollution from Midwest farms.

Trump: John Pemble/Iowa Public Radio, Clinton: Clay Masters/Iowa Public Radio

While the third and final presidential debate set for Wednesday evening will surely be marked by the candidates' disagreements, a forum debating their positions on food and farm issues Wednesday morning was notable for showcasing where the nominees agree.

Jason Parrott

In July 1984 I was 12 years old. Walter Mondale, a former senator from my home state of Minnesota, chose Geraldine Ferraro as his running mate for the 1984 Presidential election.

Last night Hillary Clinton - a woman born and raised in the Chicago suburbs – accepted Democrats’ nomination for President.

In roughly 100 days, voters will decide whether she or Republican Donald Trump will be the next president. Which means it’s the beginning of the end for President Barack Obama.

Illinois was right up front throughout the convention.

Literally.

Hillary Clinton was born in Chicago in 1947, and raised in the suburbs. Sixty-eight years later, she’s making history as the first woman to be nominated for President by a major party.

Following, a handful ladies in Illinois’ delegation reflect on Clinton’s candidacy and on what it’s like to be a woman in politics.

T.J. Carson

On a bright and cool afternoon on the campus of Monmouth College, around 250 students went through commencement with a Pulitzer Prize winner and political commentator providing the words of wisdom.

Alex Hanson/Flickr

Democratic presidential hopeful Senator Bernie Sanders said Tuesday that he opposes federal measures that would bar states from requiring labels on food containing genetically modified ingredients.

Caucus Night in Keokuk

Feb 2, 2016
Jason Parrott / TSPR

After more than a year of build-up and anticipation, Iowans finally gathered in schools, churches, and community centers Monday night to officially kick-off the Presidential voting season. They spent an hour, on average, listening to speeches about the candidates, checking a square on a ballot, and pleading with their neighbors, friends, and strangers to back their candidate.

Iowa Public Radio's Joyce Russell, Sarah Boden, Amy Mayer

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz won the Iowa caucuses for the Republican presidential nomination, while the Democratic race between former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders was considered neck-and-neck early this morning.

Sec. Hillary Clinton Campaigns in Burlington

Jan 21, 2016
Jason Parrott / TSPR

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is locked in a tight race with Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders with the Iowa Caucus less than two weeks away. She spent Tuesday night trying to solidify support from Democrats in southeast Iowa.

Bernie Sanders & Democratic Socialism

Dec 7, 2015
Credit: Johnny Cather, TSPR

Former U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) is in the running for the Democratic presidential nomination, but he has labeled himself as a democratic socialist.  Some potential voters have found that label confusing.

The Republican presidential candidates made demands recently concerning the format of debates and the questions asked.  They want more say over how the forums are handled.

Credit: Johnny Cather, TSPR

The second Democratic presidential debate took place at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa over the weekend. The campus is home to more than 4,000 full-time students and that's important to the candidates because young adults in Iowa vote 12% more frequently than the national average of 45%.