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My Farm Roots: Farm Life Anything but Quiet

Jul 21, 2014
Suzanne Hogan for Harvest Public Media

Jack and Diane Aaron lived in Strawberry Hill in Kansas City, Kan., for decades. They loved their neighborhood and it was close to family. But when a friend passed away and left them land on a farm, they decided to take a chance on country living.

While farm life is different, they found it’s anything but quiet.

“Out here we’ve got, just different sounds. We have birds that will wake us up. A cat that likes to wake me up at six because he wants to eat,” Diane Aaron said. “It’s peaceful, but it doesn’t make you crazy,”

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With trillions dollars of government spending up for grabs, lobbyists from all ends of the spectrum, representing environmental interests, biotech companies, food companies, farmers,  flocked to Capitol Hill to find their piece of the Farm Bill pie.

(Courtesy David Kosling/USDA)

The Farm Bill touches everything from crops to consumers. And the massive piece of legislation spends nearly a trillion dollars over the next ten years.

My Farm Roots: Touch the Ground

Jul 15, 2014
Jacob McCleland for Harvest Public Media

As a young man, Elisha Pullen never imagined he would spend his days on the farm.

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

A furry beast, a brave rider and a roaring crowd make up the list of ingredients for the Western rodeo tradition known as “mutton busting.”

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Most family vacations are remembered for endless car rides, packed tourist beaches and a string of poorly decorated hotel rooms.

Courtesy Kurt Rosentrater

Global hunger has no easy answer.

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Farms aren’t just for food any more.

Sarah McCammon for Harvest Public Media

Cargill, one of the country’s largest pork producers, announced Monday it will stop using gestation crates.

What does the Right to Farm mean in Missouri?

Jun 6, 2014
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Members of Congress are throwing their support behind a proposed “right to farm” amendment in Missouri’s constitution. But critics are pointing to the measure’s ambiguous language as problematic.

Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

Nathan Anderson stops his red pick-up truck alongside a cornfield on his farm near Cherokee, Iowa. The young farmer pulls on a heavy brown hoodie, thick, long, sturdy gloves and a beekeeper’s hat with a screened veil. He approaches a pair of hives sitting on the edge of a field recently planted with corn and adjusts a yellow plastic flap that traps some of the pollen the bees bring back to their hive.

Pietro Izzo/Flickr

The former operators of a large egg farm in Iowa have agreed to plead guilty to federal charges in connection with a major salmonella outbreak in 2010.

Aquaponics Brings Produce and Fish Under One Roof

May 15, 2014
Pat Blank for Harvest Public Media

Farmers all over the country are using hydroponic technology to grow produce indoors, year-round, in nutrient rich water. And fish farmers around the globe have figured out how to raise their catch in tanks. Now, some operations are combining the two, raising both produce and fish.

Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

Recognizing that the demand for local food is growing to between $5 and 7 billion a year, the USDA announced a new effort aimed at connecting farmers with urban shoppers.

Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

Harvest Public Media’s three-part series takes a look at the growing national popularity of local foods.

eXtension Farm Energy/Flickr

Biofuels made in the Midwest from corn stover -- the leftovers of harvested corn plants -- might be worse for global warming than gasoline in the short term.

Stephen D/Flickr

An alarming number of farmers in the U.S. take their own lives, according to the magazine Newsweek.

File: Peter Gray/Harvest Public Media

Hog farmers are now required to report outbreaks of certain viral diseases that have spread across the country during the past year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Jacob McCleland for Harvest Public Media

Water experts worried about Asian carp may have new hope.

cedric1981/Flickr

You’re much more likely to get a foodborne illness eating at a restaurant than in your own home, according to a new report.

Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

The U. S. Department of Agriculture is predicting fewer acres will be planted in corn this year, compared to last year, while soybean acreage will be up.

Wikipedia

When Colorado cantaloupe laden with the deadly pathogen listeria killed more than 30 people in 2011, shockwaves rippled throughout the food industry.

Drones: Coming Soon to a Farm Near You?

Mar 20, 2014
Peter Gray/Harvest Public Media

Unmanned aerial vehicles aren’t just for spies or for the battlefield. Farmers all over the country think drones can give them a leg up, too.

Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

Many of the food terrorism scenarios outlined by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration involve liquid.

File: Jeremy Bernfeld/Harvest Public Media

It sounds like the plot of a Hollywood blockbuster. Villains in trench coats scheme ways to cause the most destruction and chaos. They settle on a food company, an easy target, and plan to lace the products with a chemical or pathogen. The hero finds out the plan with enough time to save the day.

Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

A couple of seeds, some fertilizer, a little sunshine – just add water and you’re ready to harvest your crops, right?

Courtesy of Sue Lamont

One extra egg a day. What would that mean to your family?

Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

When it comes to keeping data secure, farmers are worried about some of the same issues as the rest of us.

Purdue University Extension

Despite what they may be thinking now, Midwest grain farmers and backyard gardeners alike may be thankful for the recent arctic temperatures before 2014 is out.

Spike in Propane Price Worries Midwest Farmers

Feb 11, 2014
Peter Gray/Harvest Public Media

Residents across the Midwest are struggling with tight propane supplies, especially in this bitterly cold, snowy winter. But it’s not just homes in rural counties that are lacking adequate heating fuel.

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