Harvest Public Media

Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

Harvest Public Media’s three-part series takes a look at the growing national popularity of local foods.

eXtension Farm Energy/Flickr

Biofuels made in the Midwest from corn stover -- the leftovers of harvested corn plants -- might be worse for global warming than gasoline in the short term.

Stephen D/Flickr

An alarming number of farmers in the U.S. take their own lives, according to the magazine Newsweek.

File: Peter Gray/Harvest Public Media

Hog farmers are now required to report outbreaks of certain viral diseases that have spread across the country during the past year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Jacob McCleland for Harvest Public Media

Water experts worried about Asian carp may have new hope.

cedric1981/Flickr

You’re much more likely to get a foodborne illness eating at a restaurant than in your own home, according to a new report.

Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

The U. S. Department of Agriculture is predicting fewer acres will be planted in corn this year, compared to last year, while soybean acreage will be up.

Wikipedia

When Colorado cantaloupe laden with the deadly pathogen listeria killed more than 30 people in 2011, shockwaves rippled throughout the food industry.

Drones: Coming Soon to a Farm Near You?

Mar 20, 2014
Peter Gray/Harvest Public Media

Unmanned aerial vehicles aren’t just for spies or for the battlefield. Farmers all over the country think drones can give them a leg up, too.

Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

Many of the food terrorism scenarios outlined by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration involve liquid.

File: Jeremy Bernfeld/Harvest Public Media

It sounds like the plot of a Hollywood blockbuster. Villains in trench coats scheme ways to cause the most destruction and chaos. They settle on a food company, an easy target, and plan to lace the products with a chemical or pathogen. The hero finds out the plan with enough time to save the day.

Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

A couple of seeds, some fertilizer, a little sunshine – just add water and you’re ready to harvest your crops, right?

Courtesy of Sue Lamont

One extra egg a day. What would that mean to your family?

Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

When it comes to keeping data secure, farmers are worried about some of the same issues as the rest of us.

Purdue University Extension

Despite what they may be thinking now, Midwest grain farmers and backyard gardeners alike may be thankful for the recent arctic temperatures before 2014 is out.

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