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Dakota Access

Jason Parrott / TSPR

The Lee County Attorney's Office has dropped the criminal charges against five more people arrested last fall for protesting construction of the Dakota Access crude oil pipeline.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

The members of the Lee County Board want to know why the county is not being reimbursed for all of its expenses related to construction of the Dakota Access crude oil pipeline. They say local tax dollars should not be spent in any way on the project.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

Five women are refusing to accept a plea deal in connection with their arrest last fall for protesting the construction of the Dakota Access crude oil pipeline through Lee County. Instead, they want to go to trial.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

Lee County Sheriff Stacy Weber is not supporting the decision to dismiss most of the remaining charges against people arrested last fall during multiple protests against the Dakota Access crude oil pipeline. Weber told Tri States Public Radio that it's difficult to explain to his deputies that their efforts equate to $60 in court costs.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

The Lee County Attorney's Office is dismissing most of the remaining charges against the people arrested last fall during the weeks-long protest against the Dakota Access Crude Oil Pipeline.

CAROLINA HIDALGO | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Brian Stover raises chickens at his house in rural Marion County, Illinois, just across the road from the Patoka Tank Farm where the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline ends — about 75 miles east of St. Louis.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

Hundreds of people from across the country traveled to Lee County, Iowa during the past two months to try to stop the construction of a crude oil pipeline through four Midwest states. It now appears that effort is over and demonstrators are moving on to other locations.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

Opponents of the nearly 1,200 mile crude oil pipeline being built through four Midwest states say they’ve been able to halt the boring under the Mississippi River in Lee County, Iowa by blocking access to a gravel road. But the company behind the roughly $4 billion project said that's not the case.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

The around-the-clock encampment near the site in Lee County where the Dakota Access pipeline will cross the Mississippi River swelled to more than 250 people last Saturday morning and afternoon. Opponents of the pipeline said even more people are needed if they are going to permanently halt construction.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

Joseph Ryan of St. Louis, MO, caravanned with about ten people to demonstrate at the site in Lee County, IA, where the Dakota Access crude oil pipeline is supposed to cross the Mississippi River. He said he was prepared to do whatever it took to defend the planet and save its water.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

Public opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline is growing in the tri states region, be it through marches or vigils.   Pipeline opponents hope that continues this weekend when their efforts move to the next step: civil disobedience.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

Jessica Reznicek, 35, of Des Moines arrived in Lee County about two weeks ago. Since then, she has made herself known to the region as a supporter of the Mississippi River and an opponent of the Dakota Access crude oil pipeline.

Shane Balkowitsch/Wikimedia Commons

A little over 850 miles west of Macomb a war is being waged over something that is necessary to all life on earth.  Water. 

Dakota Access plans to begin construction in the next week or so on a new crude oil pipeline that would stretch from North Dakota to central Illinois. That's according to the firm hired by Lee County to keep tabs on the project on behalf of landowners.

The public will have opportunities Monday to learn more about a crude oil pipeline that could run through southeast Iowa and west central Illinois.