civil rights

Rich Egger

C.T. Vivian's family moved from segregated Missouri to Macomb when he was young because his parents felt he would receive a better education in a university community.  Now that community's school district plans to honor the civil rights activist for his lifetime of achievement.

Rich Egger

A couple communities in western Illinois continued their long traditions of commemorating Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Jamelle Bouie/flickr

Ferguson, Mo., Police Chief Tom Jackson last week apologized to the family of unarmed African-American teen Michael Brown.

Wikipedia

Republicans joined Democrats to pass the American Civil Rights Act of 1964 in an act of bi-partisanship that’s rare today.

This week’s commemoration of 1963’s March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom should note that on the 50th anniversary of that occasion, one of the most effective demonstrations for human rights in the planet’s history is unfinished.

Emphasis - May 18

May 18, 2012

Rich Egger's guest is Civil Rights leader C.T. Vivian, who grew up in Macomb. Dr Vivian was back in town to speak at the Dealing With Difference Institute at Western Illinois University.

Vivian was a close friend of Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. and worked alongside him during the American Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and '60s. He said the world does not change unless people get involved.