astronomy

2:04 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

New Technique Used to Detect Water Vapor on "Hot Jupiter" Exoplanet

Lead in text: 
Scientists have detected water vapor on other planets in the past, but these detections could only take place under very specific circumstances. The new technique expands a radial velocity technique, commonly used to detect carbon dioxide using light in the visible spectrum, into the infrared spectrum. This has opened up the ability of astronomers to analyze the molecules that comprise the atmosphere of exoplanets that don't exist under those specific circumstances.
Credit: Alexandra Lockwood (Caltech), background image used with permission from David Aguilar(CfA). Media Contact: Steve JeffersonCommunications OfficerW. M. Keck Observatory sjefferson@keck.hawaii.edu (808) 881-3827 California Institute of Technology (Caltech) astronomers using data gathered at the W. M. Keck Observatory have developed a new technique for planetary scientists that could provide insight into how many water planets like Earth exist within our universe.
11:09 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Second Jupiter Discovered by SEEDS Project

Lead in text: 
The research is part of the Strategic Explorations of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS), a project to directly image extrasolar planets and protoplanetary disks around several hundred nearby stars using the Subaru Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The five-year project began in 2009 and is led by Motohide Tamura at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ).
Astronomers in the SEEDS Project have discovered the least massive planet ever detected around a star like the sun. A so-called "second Jupiter," planet GJ 504b is about four times more massive than Jupiter and has an effective temperature of about 460 degrees Fahrenheit (237 Celsius.) Us
One of the Universe's Mysteries
10:38 pm
Wed May 2, 2012

Scientist Looking for Answers to Dark Matter

Matthew Walker with Sally Egler, who was one of his teachers in Macomb

An astronomer who grew up in Macomb is one of the researchers looking to unlock the mystery that is dark matter.

“I think people should care about dark matter insofar as they care about the universe in which they live,” Matthew Walker said.

Dark matter cannot be seen, yet scientists estimate it accounts for roughly 80% of the matter in the universe.  

“What we have here on earth is great and unique and important, but it's clearly not all that there is,” Walker said.

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