Arts

Books
10:57 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Could Banning Books Actually Encourage More Readers?

What do the books "The Catcher in the Rye," "Invisible Man" and Anne Frank's diary have in common? They've all been banned from libraries. On Sunday, the American Library Association begins its annual recognition of Banned Books Week. Tell Me More host Michel Martin talks to former ALA president Loriene Roy about targeted books, and efforts to keep them on shelves.

Barbershop
10:48 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Is Public Numb To Mass Shootings?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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TED Radio Hour
9:28 am
Fri September 20, 2013

What Are The Dangers Of A Single Story?

Novelist Chimamanda Adichie at the TEDGlobal conference in 2009.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 12:25 pm

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Framing The Story.

About Chimamanda Adichie's TEDTalk

Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding.

About Chimamanda Adichie

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TED Radio Hour
9:28 am
Fri September 20, 2013

What Makes A Good Story?

Filmmaker Andrew Stanton on the TED stage in 2012.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 12:45 pm

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Framing The Story.

About Andrew Stanton's TEDTalk

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Movie Reviews
8:52 am
Fri September 20, 2013

In 'Rush' As In Real Life, It's The Driver, Not The Car

The radically different Formula One racers James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth, left) and Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl) are at the center of Ron Howard's Rush, a biographical drama that's as strong on character as on cars.
Jaap Buitendijk Universal Pictures

You might think that if the driving scenes in your auto-racing movie are the least interesting thing about it, that's a problem. But it's far from a sign of engine trouble for Rush, a swift-moving, character-rich biopic whose kinetic Grand Prix sequences are constantly being overshadowed by genuinely riveting scenes of ... people talking.

But then in a film written by Peter Morgan — of The Queen and Frost/Nixon -- maybe it's no wonder that questions like why they drive, why they want to win and who they want to beat take center stage.

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