2 County Seats

Residents of south Lee County will have to wait a little longer to get their driver's licenses in Keokuk.

Chris Spann, Lee County Treasurer, told the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday that she now hopes to re-open the bureau in the south Lee County Courthouse in mid-to-late May, which is about a month behind schedule.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

State Senator Rich Taylor (D-Mount Pleasant) is surprised that one of the bills he sponsored this year is not sailing through the Iowa Legislature.

The bill would give residents the authority to call for a special election to "relocate a county seat, establish an additional county seat, or consolidate county seats."  Such a vote would require 60% approval to pass.

Flickr / OregonDOT

Lee County Treasurer Chris Spann now has a whole new outlook on the dreaded "Friday the 13th."

A trial date has been set for a lawsuit filed against several members of the Lee County Board of Supervisors over possible violations of Iowa's Open Meetings Law.

One southeast Iowa lawmaker is re-entering the heated debate in Lee County over where government services should be offered and where the county seat(s) should be located.

The most controversial aspect of the reorganization of four Lee County departments in mid-2011 could soon be reversed.

A lawsuit filed against three members of the Lee County Board of Supervisors has been expanded to include a new incident alleged to have occurred just a couple weeks ago.

The three members of the Lee County Board of Supervisors accused by several citizens of violating Iowa's open meetings law do not want the case to be heard in Keokuk.  They also feel the case should not be heard by a jury.

Jason Parrott / Tri States Public Radio

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has provided Lee County with a lengthy checklist for security improvements at five of its buildings.

The three members of the Lee County Board of Supervisors accused of violating Iowa's open meetings law appear to have several options when it comes to legal representation.

Three members of the Lee County Board of Supervisors are accused of violating Iowa's Open Meetings Act.

Jason Parrott

For the first time in a long time, the Lee County Board of Supervisors discussed the idea of office consolidation and no one on the board or in the audience raised their voices or made disparaging remarks about someone or some group of people.

Lee County residents have plenty of work to do if they want to change how the members of the Board of Supervisors are elected every four years.

Daily Gate City Newspaper

Lee County will not be making history any time soon as it will remain the only county in Iowa with two county seats for the foreseeable future.

Jason Parrott

Lee County could soon have just one county seat -- and it's safe to say that not everyone is happy about that.

Currently, Lee is the only county in Iowa with two county seats, Keokuk and Fort Madison, and it's been that way for more than 150-years.

The first sign of change came in the summer of 2011 when the Board of Supervisors voted to reorganize four departments.

Instead of maintaining offices in both cities, the county treasurer and auditor moved all operations and employees to Fort Madison while the assessor and recorder set up shop in Keokuk.

Pages