Morning Edition

Monday- Friday, 4:00- 9:00am
Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep and Tri States Public Radio's Emily Boyer

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:29 am
Mon August 13, 2012

Too Much Calcium Could Cause Kidney, Heart Problems, Researchers Say

Federal health officials recommend 1,000 milligrams of calcium per day for people younger than 50, but some are overdoing it.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 8:08 am

When it comes to a healthy diet — especially for women, and especially after menopause — nutritionists, doctors, everybody it seems, will tell you: calcium, calcium, calcium.

Federal health officials recommend that women and men younger than 50 consume 1,000 milligrams of calcium per day. The recommendation goes up to 1,200 milligrams after age 70 for men and after menopause for women, when a major drop in estrogen causes bone loss.

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Middle East
2:21 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Egypt's Christians Form Their Own Brotherhood

Egyptian riot police sit in the shade by damaged buildings as people walk through debris from the aftermath of clashes on Aug. 1 between Christians and Muslims in Dahshour, on the outskirts of Cairo. The violence was sparked by a dispute between a Muslim and Christian over laundered clothing.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 8:11 pm

A former leader of the Muslim Brotherhood occupies Egypt's presidential palace, leaving many of the country's Coptic Christians deeply anxious about their future.

Now, a new group calling itself the Christian Brotherhood has emerged, vowing to stand up for the rights of Copts.

On a Cairo rooftop recently, members of the new Christian Brotherhood are debating how to respond to the first major outbreak of Muslim-Christian violence since President Mohammed Morsi came into office in June.

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Animals
5:55 am
Fri August 10, 2012

London's Zoo Gets Animals Into Olympic Spirit

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. In the spirit of the Olympics, the London Zoo is presenting its own games: Animal Athletes in Action. Bob the Owl's 100-centimeter sprint has been a big hit. Adoring crowds cheer on the penguins in diving, otters in swimming and zebras in long-distance running, all competing, not for medals, but tasty morsels. Personal favorite: the insects weightlifting 850 times their body weight. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:49 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Semi-Automatic Rifle Arrives In TV Box

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Seth Horvitz says all he wanted was a TV. The Washington, D.C. resident was expecting it to be shipped through Amazon. Instead, he received a military-grade, semi-automatic rifle. Mr. Horvitz complained to Amazon, UPS and the seller. Nobody took responsibility. But police were happy to take the gun, which is illegal in the nation's capital. The Second Amendment assures the right to bear arms, not to ship them to the wrong address. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

World
5:39 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Anti-Blasphemy Law Introduced In Tunisia

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A small incident in Tunisia hints at some of the larger strains in the revolutions we call the Arab Spring. Police arrested an activist and journalist named Sofiene Chourabi. He was a prominent figure in Tunisia's uprising against a longtime ruler. But he differed with the new government that came to power, which is dominated by an Islamist party. Chourabi found himself under arrest after he criticized a proposed blasphemy law that he saw as a restriction of free speech. We talked about this with Tunisian journalist Asma Ghribi.

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