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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

How To Take A Selfie With Your Dog

Oct 2, 2015

When you're trying to take a selfie with your dog, telling your pet to "say cheese" probably won't elicit a smile.

But a tennis ball perched on top of a smartphone is a real attention getter.

The "pooch selfie" is a simple attachment that allows dog owners to attach the fluffy ball.

It's been a hit on Kickstarter. Now to the bigger challenge — getting cats to focus.

The largest police department in the country is changing the way it deals with the use of force by its officers.

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Kristen Brady was standing in a parking lot yesterday. It was the middle of the morning in Roseburg, Ore. She was chatting with a friend when they heard what they thought was a car backfiring.

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A Fake Letter About Fake Deer In Wisconsin

Oct 1, 2015

Fake deer snuck into Wisconsin's annual deer count the past two years.

At least according to a letter sent out on Department of National Resources stationary.

Residents were asked to remove deer lawn ornaments so that they wouldn't be included in this years count.

The department took to Facebook on Wednesday to dispute the story, saying the letter is fake.

But many Wisconsinites had fun with it on Facebook.

Including this concern: "What about the very important annual gnome census?"

You know the British slogan: Keep calm, and carry on.

That attitude saw the British through World War II, and Americans through the financial crisis.

But apparently it does not apply when Facebook crashes.

Numerous police departments report receiving calls when the site goes down.

The last time it happened, Britain's Independent noticed that the Kingston police tweeted: please don't call us.

Houston, Texas, police also tweeted an advisory: "We cannot fix Facebook."

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



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A tragic incident this week in Yemen is intensifying scrutiny of a Saudi-led military campaign there, as well as the U.S. role in backing that Saudi offensive.

The Saudis are fighting rebels called Houthis who ousted the government. And while all sides are accused of abuses, increasing blame is turning toward the Saudis and their allies.

It's a typical morning at the Dupont Veterinary Clinic in Lafayette, La. Dr. Phillip Dupont is caring for cats and dogs in the examining room while his wife, Paula, answers the phone and pet owners' questions. Their two dogs are sleeping on the floor behind her desk.

"That's Ken and Henry," Paula says, pointing to the slim, midsize dogs with floppy ears and long snouts. Both dogs are tan, gray and white, with similar markings. "I put a red collar on Ken and a black collar on Henry so I can tell who's who."

Dog Drives His Owner's Truck Into A Lake

Sep 30, 2015

This could happen to any dog owner. A man in Ellsworth, Maine, walked his Yorkshire terrier.

Which wanted to fight another dog. So the man put his terrier in his truck.

And the dog put the truck in gear.

It started rolling, downhill, 75 feet, into a lake.

And sank in 10 feet of water.

A family friend dove in to rescue the dog, and it's easy to imagine that dog's face - freshly bathed, completely oblivious, wondering where's the food.

Not all was lost in the sinking of the Titanic. And several of its artifacts will be auctioned online Wednesday.

They include a lunch menu offering grilled mutton chops ... and a ticket for the ship's Turkish baths.

Both survived in the pocket of a passenger who jumped into the "Money Boat," a notorious lifeboat taken over by a handful of millionaires who left everybody else behind.

The crumpled menu is expected to sell for $50,000.

At a Catholic Mass at the Magyar Szentek Plébánia church, in a leafy riverside area of Budapest, there is no extra collection for refugees. No canned food drive. No charity bake sale.

This church, like many across Hungary, is caught in the middle of a debate on how to help refugees — or whether even to help at all.

Pope Francis has called on all of Europe's Catholics to take in refugees, but in Hungary, a predominantly Catholic country, church leaders have been hesitant.

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