Ask Me Another

Saturday, 9:00- 10:00am
  • Hosted by Ophira Eisenberg

Puzzlemaster Will Shortz and Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! host Peter Sagal walk into a bar... No, it's not the start of a joke. It's the essence of Ask Me Another, a rambunctious hour that blends brainteasers and local pub trivia night with comedy and music. Host Ophira Eisenberg invites in-studio guests and listeners alike to stretch their noggins, tickle their funny bones, and enjoy witty banter and guitar riffs from house musician Jonathan Coulton.

For an hour, listeners can play along as Eisenberg puts questions to a rotating band of puzzle gurus, audience members and special mystery guests, who then takes a turn in the contestant's chair facing trivia games written especially for him or her. What you'll hear resembles the casual intimacy of game night at a friend's house: one where scores are forgotten in favor of hilarious gaffes.

The puzzle gurus behind Ask Me Another include John Chaneski, who devised tough questions and answers for "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" before becoming one of the "puzzle guys" on the radio program "A Way With Words"; Art Chung who has written for and produced television game shows including "Who Wants to be a Millionaire?," "Cash Cab," "The World Series of Pop Culture," and "Stump the Schwab"; and actor/writer Will Hines who has performed and taught improvisational comedy at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre for years, and obsessively reads books on compiling baseball statistics, a task he will never have to do.

Ask Me Another is recorded live at The Bell House in Brooklyn, NY.

Street Smarts

May 14, 2015

In Southern California, the car is king, and traffic is queen. In this final round, every answer is a common phrase or proper name that contain a type of roadway.

Heard in A Mad Men Endgame

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

When Matthew Weiner was working as a writer on the HBO series The Sopranos, a crewman walked up to him and said, "I heard you were the son of a doctor from Hancock Park. What are you doing here?" Weiner responded, "Well, I have what they call 'an imagination.' "

More than 15 years later, that imagination landed Weiner a hit series on AMC. To date, Mad Men has earned him seven Emmy Awards, three Golden Globes, a Peabody and more.

You Call That An Ending?

May 14, 2015

In honor of the final episode of Mad Men, we consider some TV series that ended in very bizarre ways. For instance, which family matriarch sits with her typewriter in the basement, as a voiceover tells us that she never won the lottery?

Answer:

Like A Confused Boss

May 14, 2015

In this game, we give a sentence with an overly literal misuse of a common business cliché, and you give us the cliché. For example, "I really need you to force the flat rectangular paper container to move forward!" is "push the envelope."

Heard in A Mad Men Endgame

Come Sail Away

May 14, 2015

Inspired by the waters off the coast of Santa Barbara, we rewrote the lyrics to the song "Sloop John B" so that the verses describe real or fictional sailing vessels.

Heard in A Mad Men Endgame

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

Initially Incorrect

Apr 23, 2015

An intialism is an abbreviation of a phrase that is pronounced letter-by-letter, like TMI. In this game, every clue is a sentence that ends with a well-known initialism, BUT is the opposite of what we're looking for.

Heard in Quiz Me The Way I Am

"AMA" Let You Finish

Apr 23, 2015

For this final round, every answer ends with our show's initials, A-M-A. We say, "This Nepalese prince found enlightenment and became the Buddha;" you say, "Siddhartha Gautama."

Heard in Quiz Me The Way I Am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Remember Me?

Apr 23, 2015

VIP Ingrid Michaelson whips out her ukulele and joins Jonathan Coulton for a game about amnesia-afflicted movie characters, set to the tune of Gotye's "Somebody That I Used To Know."

Heard in Quiz Me The Way I Am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

There's no shortage of tech startups in Silicon Valley, and since these companies are founded by people who can identify every Star Wars character at the drop of a hat, their names tend to sound pretty weird. Is Zurg a new app that analyzes your dreams, Doctor Who's nemesis, or a 12th-century warlord? For our show at San Francisco Sketchfest, we make contestants earn their nerd cred by telling us — is it a historical figure, a sci-fi villain or a tech company?

See if you measure up with our quiz!

Grandparent Movie Database

Apr 8, 2015

If grandparents ran IMDB, descriptions would sound like this: "He's that one in the Grabbed movies? He has a particular set of skills." Can you guess the actors by their slightly confused bios?

Heard in Sketchfest 2015: Alex Borstein, Brad Bird and Dan Savage

Although she's best known as the voice of Lois, the put-upon wife of Peter Griffin on Seth MacFarlane's Family Guy, Alex Borstein is a jane-of-all-trades. She's done improv, stand-up, sketch comedy on MADTv, and wrote for the '90s cartoon Pinky and the Brain.

Born To Run And Fail

Apr 2, 2015

A rewritten Bruce Springsteen classic--growled to perfection by They Might Be Giants' John Flansburgh--recounts candidates who ran for President, and lost. "Champs like us, Joey we were born to run!"

Heard in Smooth Criminal

Measure For Measure

Apr 2, 2015

Go the distance for this final round, where all the answers contain some form of measurement. For example, the nickname for London's Metropolitan Police Service is "Scotland Yard."

Heard in Smooth Criminal

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

Pair It Down

Apr 2, 2015

Why are Doc Holliday and Dr. Martens a paradox? Because they're a "pair of 'Docs.'" Every answer is a word that begins with the letters p-a-r-a, followed by the word that two clues have in common.

Heard in Smooth Criminal

Everything Old is New Again

Mar 19, 2015

For the final round all answers in this game contain the letters "n-e-w" or "o-l-d" in order. What term did Hugh Hefner coin for the large portrait stuck in a magazine? Hint: it's not a centerf-new.

Heard in Looking For Answers

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