Police Chief Hiring Process Underway
9:00 pm
Sun July 8, 2012

Interest in Burlington Property

There appears to be some interest in a large piece of real estate in Burlington.

The city spent about $5-million to tear down homes and relocate residents from a roughly 28-acre site known locally as “The Manor.” 

It is located near the intersection of Highway 34 and Highway 61.

The idea behind the project was commercial development, but a potential developer from Minnesota backed away.

The result is that the property has sat vacant for about four years.

Burlington hired Terrus Real Estate Group out of Des Moines, earlier this year, to market the property.

The company’s website lists the site for $2.4-million while touting the traffic count and population in the region.

City Manager Jim Ferneau says a local developer has reached out to Terrus about purchasing the entire site on an option.

The identity of the developer has not been made public.

Ferneau say the Burlington City Council is willing to accept an offer from the local developer.

He says the city would require a provision that gives it some oversight as to what types of developments could occur on the property.

POLICE CHIEF SEARCH

It could be weeks before Burlington hires a new police chief.

A replacement is needed due to the retirement of Dan Luttenegger, who had been with the department for 30+ years.

Major Doug Beaird will serve as interim chief until a replacement is named.

Ferneau says Burlington received 17 applications, which are being reviewed by city staff.

“They have to get scored and meet a base qualification for the position,” says Ferneau.  “I think 7 of those did not.  We now have to take the ten and go through them and make sure to certify they are truly eligible.”

Ferneau anticipates as many as five candidates could advance to the interview phase, which should take place early next month.

He hopes to make a recommendation to the Burlington City Council shortly after the interviews so a new chief could be in place by early September.

NO BORROWING NEEDED

Burlington did not have to borrow money to make its final payroll for the fiscal year that ended June 30.

The city council had authorized the borrowing of up to $2-million.

City Manager Jim Ferneau says the city made it by about $30,000, though, thanks to some late arriving money from FEMA.