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"64 Arts" Draws Interest from Around the Country

Sep 23, 2015

The juror for this year’s 64 Arts National Juried Exhibition at the Buchanan Center for the Arts in Monmouth said he does not like passing judgment on art.

“All art is valid. I just tried to put together a show that talked about contemporary issues but then also highlighted technical ability,” said Frank Saliani, who said he considered himself more of a curator than a judge.

Works from 29 artists were accepted from among more than 400 entries.  And although Saliani does not like passing judgment, he was asked to name award winners for the show. His choices:

  • Best of Show: "The American Dream - Oh Darling! It's Too Distracting" Photography - Bin Feng, Savannah, Georgia
  • Painting Award: "First and Ten; Do It Again" Sarah Bielski, Statesboro, Georgia
  • Mixed Media: "Mistaken for Another - Seek Consultation" Ian Shelly, Macomb, Illinois
  • Sculpture Award: "A Safe Place" Emily Bennett, Terre Haute, Indiana
  • Works of Paper: "Apocrypha File: Divine Guidance" Timothy Massey, Spencerport, New York
  • Photography: "The Suburbs" Brennan Probst, Wilmette, Illinois
  • Ceramics: "Factory Flask" Eleanor Heimbaugh, Hays, Kansas

Saliani is a ceramic artist from Brooklyn, New York.  He believes artists around the country –whether they’re from urban or rural areas -- have a great deal in common.

Frank Saliani (left) during the opening reception for the exhibit.
Credit Rich Egger

“It’s really hard to say that art work from any one place is different than art work from any other, especially in today’s day and age where the Internet has pretty much broken down all the barriers that geography would have previously set up,” Saliani said.

The 2015 64 Arts National Juried Exhibition remains on display until October 23. Saliani said that gives people plenty of opportunities to delve into the show. "They should come see it more than once, they should come with friends, and they should talk about the work,” he said.

Saliani hopes people come away from the exhibit recognizing that it’s a big world out there, that a lot of people want to comment on it, and that all of their voices are valid.