Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Two-Way
2:55 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

NSA's Encrypted Tweet: We're Hiring Code Breakers

The National Security Agency tweeted an encoded job ad on Monday.
Patrick Semansky AP

What better way to recruit potential code breakers than to advertise in cipher? That's what the NSA did Monday morning with this mysterious tweet:

According to The Washington Post, if you're good at breaking substitution ciphers, this is what you'd come up with:

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The Two-Way
12:03 pm
Fri May 2, 2014

Rock-Paper-Scissors Strategy Could Be More Than Mere Child's Play

Contestants compete in a rock-paper-scissors tournament in Gainesville, Fla., in 2012. A new study indicates it's not as random as it seems.
Matt Stamey Gainesville Sun/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 3:22 pm

The child's game rock-paper-scissors is designed for a random outcome in which no player has an advantage over any other.

While that might be true based solely on random probability, it ignores the way humans actually play the game, according to a new study published by Cornell University.

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The Two-Way
11:25 am
Fri May 2, 2014

Landslide In Afghanistan Reportedly Leaves Hundreds Missing

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 1:24 pm

Days of heavy rains have triggered a landslide in Afghanistan's northeastern Badakhshan province, smashing through a mountain village and leaving hundreds of people missing.

"At least 400 to 500 people are still under a huge landslide, and they are all believed to be dead. This number may increase," Col. Abdul Qadeer Sayad, a deputy police chief of Badakhshan province, told Reuters.

Ari Gaitanis, a United Nations spokesman, put the toll at 350 dead following the slide that buried the village of Hobo Barik.

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The Two-Way
9:06 am
Fri May 2, 2014

Marijuana Banking Bill Is Snuffed Out In Colorado

Partygoers listen to live music and smoke pot on the second of two days at the annual 4/20 marijuana festival in Denver, last month. While the sale of marijuana is legal in the state, a legal finance mechanism is still in doubt.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 1:47 pm

It's OK to sell pot in Colorado, but there's still nowhere but the mattress to legally stash the proceeds.

That's the continuing problem for legal marijuana dealers in the state, who are caught between the state's legalization of cannabis and federal laws that still classify it as a controlled substance.

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The Two-Way
8:09 am
Fri May 2, 2014

Unemployment Drops To 6.3 Percent, Lowest In 5 Years

Job seekers sign in before meeting prospective employers during a January career fair at a hotel in Dallas.
LM Otero AP

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 11:06 am

This post has been updated.

The nation's economy added a robust 288,000 jobs in April, far more than forecast, and the unemployment rate fell to 6.3 percent, its lowest level in five years, according to the Labor Department.

The rate, which is the lowest since September 2008, was down from 6.7 percent in March.

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