Ari Shapiro

Ari Shapiro is an NPR international correspondent based in London. An award-winning journalist, his reporting covers a wide range of topics and can be heard on all of NPR's national news programs, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Prior to his current post, Shapiro reported from the NPR Washington Desk as White House Correspondent during President Barack Obama's first and second terms, as Justice Correspondent during the George W. Bush administration and as a regular guest host on NPR's newsmagazines. He is also a frequent analyst on CNN, PBS, NBC and other television news outlets.

Shapiro's reporting has consistently won national accolades. The Columbia Journalism Review recognized him with a laurel for his investigation into disability benefits for injured American veterans. The American Bar Association awarded him the Silver Gavel for exposing the failures of Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina. He was the first recipient of the American Judges' Association American gavel Award, recognizing a body of work on U.S. courts and the American justice system. And at age 25, Shapiro won the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for an investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission.

An occasional singer, Shapiro makes guest appearances with the "little orchestra" Pink Martini, whose recent albums feature several of his contributions. Since his debut at the Hollywood Bowl in 2009, Shapiro has performed live at many of the world's most storied venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York, L'Olympia in Paris, and Mount Lycabettus in Athens.

Shapiro graduated from Yale University magna cum laude and began his journalism career in the office of NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg.

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The Salt
1:28 pm
Tue December 23, 2014

Record Number Of Britons Are Using Food Banks

At the We Care food bank in Southeast London, customers pay 1 pound sterling, or about $1.60, for 10 items. The token payment is meant to ease customers' discomfort about having to use the food bank's services.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Tue December 23, 2014 5:26 pm

The United Kingdom is struggling with a situation that may sound familiar to Americans. The economy is expanding, unemployment is dropping, yet growing numbers of people don't have enough food to eat.

Six months ago, Peter Brogan was among those Britons going hungry. He'd lived a comfortable middle-class existence for the first 50 years of his life, with a house, a job and a relationship. Then the relationship fell apart, and so did his life. Between alcoholism and depression, he couldn't keep his head above water.

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National Security
3:54 am
Wed December 10, 2014

State Department Feared Torture Report Would Spark Fury. Where Is It?

Originally published on Wed December 10, 2014 5:23 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
3:17 am
Mon December 8, 2014

U.S. Tech Firms See Green As They Set Up Shop In Low-Tax Ireland

The Apple campus in Cork, southern Ireland, employs 4,000 people β€” though its financial benefits are felt across the city. But Ireland's attractive tax laws β€” which have lured other industry leaders β€” are now under scrutiny.
Paul Faith AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 8, 2014 7:54 am

Here's a fact that might surprise you: All of the top 10 U.S. companies that were born on the Internet β€” including Google, Amazon and eBay β€” have overseas corporate headquarters in Ireland.

The American tech sector is huge in Ireland. It's growing rapidly β€” and having a huge impact on life there.

But the tax system that's fueling the growth is also infuriating some people in the U.S. and Europe β€” and has Ireland reconsidering its tax code.

A City, And Country, Transformed

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World
4:42 pm
Fri November 28, 2014

Black Friday Crosses The Pond

Originally published on Fri November 28, 2014 5:22 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
1:30 pm
Fri November 28, 2014

For Northern Ireland, Wounds From 'The Troubles' Are Still Raw

The remains of Brendan Megraw are carried to St. Oliver Plunkett Church in Belfast by his brothers Kieran (second left) and Sean (second right) on Nov. 14. The remains were found in a bog 36 years after Megrew was taken by the IRA. He was one of the many who died or disappeared during the decades-long Troubles between Protestant loyalists and Catholic republicans in Northern Ireland.
Liam McBurney PA Photos/Landov

Originally published on Sat November 29, 2014 7:25 am

Sixteen years ago, the Good Friday peace agreement ended the violent conflict in Northern Ireland by creating a power-sharing government. Around the world, people point to the agreement as a model for how to resolve ethnic conflicts.

And yet, political leaders in Northern Ireland are still struggling to bring Protestant and Catholic groups together. The fact that this is even an issue might surprise many people.

When I visited Belfast, I found a city still profoundly divided.

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Parallels
3:04 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

The American Origins Of The Not-So-Traditional Celtic Knot Tattoo

Originally published on Fri January 2, 2015 4:33 pm

What is the most cliched tattoo you can think of? Chinese characters? A tribal armband?

How about a Celtic knot? Those interlocking lines that look like ropes or basket weaving.

Last week I was in Ireland and decided to investigate the roots of this trend.

I spoke with Kevin McNamara at the Dublin Ink tattoo parlor.

"It would be a weird week in the shop if I didn't do at least, like 40," he told me. "That's not a literal number, but yeah, it's nuts."

Without Celtic knots and shamrocks, McNamara said, he would never have learned how to tattoo.

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The Salt
4:36 am
Sat October 25, 2014

Tracing A Gin-Soaked Trail In London

A depiction of "Gin Lane," filled with sins caused by drunken revelries.
William Hogarth/Wikimedia

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 10:57 am

In Scotland, some long-time whisky makers are switching over to gin. In Germany, people who distill traditional brandies are doing the same. The world is in the middle of a gin distillery boom, and it is coming to America.

One place to find the roots of this boom is London, where 250 distilleries once existed in the city limits alone.

For Charles Maxwell, this story is personal. "My great-great-grandfather was apprenticed in the city of London in the 1680s to learn how to make gin," Maxwell says. "And from that day to this, we've distilled gin in London."

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Europe
4:10 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Europe's Short-Term Economic Fixes Can't Solve Long-Term Problems

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 8:57 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Animals
11:39 am
Sun October 12, 2014

American Intruder Lurks In Scottish Streams, Clawed And Hungry

In the northwestern United States, this crayfish would be just a friendly bit of local fauna. But in Scotland, it's an invasive species wreaking havoc on trout streams.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 12:14 pm

Forget Nessie: there's another insidious creature living in the waters of Scotland.

The story starts in the streams and lakes of the northwestern United States, where North American signal crayfish are a familiar sight. Turn over a rock and you may well encounter one.

But in Scottish streams and lochs, these creatures are intruders.

In the United States, we often hear about invasive Asian carp, zebra mussels or snakehead fish from China that take over American waterways. It's a two-way street: American species are causing chaos in other parts of the world, too.

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Fine Art
9:45 am
Sun October 12, 2014

On The National Mall, An American Portrait In Sand And Soil

The face in Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada's larger-than-life portrait is a composite of photos the artist took of young men from many racial backgrounds.
Tami Heilemann Department of the Interior

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 12:14 pm

Last month on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., trucks pulled up bearing thousands of tons of dark topsoil and sand. Volunteers arrived with shovels and rakes. Following an artist's instructions and guided by satellite coordinates, they laid out a design across 6 acres to create a work commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery.

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