Amanda Vinicky

Illinois Statehouse Bureau Chief

Illinois begins this week without a new budget --- though one is due by Wednesday. Last week, Governor Bruce Rauner revised his plan. He's now offering Chicago and other municipalities some pension relief.

Early on, Gov. Rauner made clear that his willingness to talk about the budget is contingent on what he calls "structural change."  Since the end of May, that has included five items:

1) a property tax freeze  (combined with changes he says will lower costs for municipalities but which unions see as an attack)

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner has vetoed the bulk of a proposed new state budget. Only funding for schools is safe.

Rauner says he had to do it because the plan approved by Democrats is out of balance and, thus, unconstitutional.

But that means Illinois in will have almost no spending authority when the new fiscal year begins next Wednesday, July 1.

Tuesday is "deadline day" for state government.  But one deadline is being given a month-long extension.

June 30th is the final day of the fiscal year; after which, the current budget expires. It's also the final day of the state's contract with its largest public employees union, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees.

Illinois schools will be able to open on time this fall, despite an ongoing budget stalemate at the statehouse.

Schools not having the money to operate had been a worry, given Gov. Bruce Rauner's condemnation of the spending plan passed by Democratic legislators.

It isn't anymore.

 Democrats are accusing Governor Bruce Rauner of "dodging" questions about how much his top staff are making. Just how much Gov. Bruce Rauner's administration is costing taxpayers was supposed to be the subject of a hearing, called by House Revenue Chairman John Bradley.

But when he asked repeatedly "is there anyone from the governor's office here to testify?" there was silence.

No one from the governor's office showed. That's a breach of legislative decorum that's virtually unheard of.

The Illinois General Assembly doesn't typically meet during the summer. But legislators are back for another one-day session today.

Rachel Otwell

Just a few of the budget bills Democrats passed have made it to Governor Bruce Rauner's desk --- where he has the ability to sign them into law, reject them entirely, or cut down the levels of spending.

Brian Mackey / WUIS/Illinois Issues

Illinois' new Republican governor and the Democrats who lead the General Assembly are deadlocked over the right path for the state.

Brian Mackey / WUIS/Illinois Issues

Additional state services are getting caught in the fight between Republican Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner and Democratic legislators.  The governor announced he's preparing to suspend funding for dozens of programs because there is still no agreement on a new state budget. 

The Illinois House rejected two versions of a local property tax freeze yesterday. That's one of a handful of items Governor Bruce Rauner says must get done before he'll consider new revenue to balance the state budget without widespread cuts.

The Senate spent all day in a rare session focused on property taxes. Rauner dismissed that as a waste of time.

Aaron Schock / Instagram

Former Congressman Aaron Schock's (R-IL) fall from political grace set in motion an unexpected special election, and that has unexpected consequences for county clerks across the 18th Congressional District.

Illinois leaders have another month to settle on a new budget plan, but given their failure to reach a deal by Sunday's initial deadline, Gov. Bruce Rauner says he must take immediate steps to manage state spending.

Illinois law gives political candidates five days to report campaign contributions of $1,000 or more, but it's been weeks since Gov. Bruce Rauner gave Republican lawmakers four times that, and some still haven't told the state. But they aren't breaking the law.

It was May 11 when Rauner's campaign spread $400,000 among Republican senators and representatives, but you wouldn't know that from looking at state election records. Many legislators still haven't disclosed the money.

Your favorite TV show might be interrupted with a pointed message purchased by Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner, though  the governor is refusing to say whether he's going to buy TV time to promote his agenda as he battles with the legislature's Democratic leaders.

Illinois' legislative session was supposed to be over by now. The schedule published months ago marked Sunday, May 31st as the adjournment date. Legislators typically don't return to Springfield until the fall. Instead, members of the General Assembly will be back beginning Thursday for a "continuous" summer session.

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