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Law
1:19 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Wire Tapping, Gay Marriage On SCOTUS Docket

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 1:35 pm

With the presidential election a month away, the Court may soon weigh in on several contentious cases. Los Angeles Times Supreme Court correspondent David Savage talks about the upcoming session and whether the Court can insulate itself from the heat of this political season.

From Our Listeners
1:15 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Letters: School Lunch And Intellectual Disability

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 1:35 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's Tuesday and it means time to read from your comments.

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Sports
1:13 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Surprise Teams Round Bases To MLB Playoffs

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 1:35 pm

The Oakland A's are headed to the playoffs for the first time in six years, and Washington's Nationals brought the pennant home for the first time since the Senators did it back in 1933. NPR's Mike Pesca talks about the surprises, the end of the baseball season and the outlook for the playoffs.

The Two-Way
12:49 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Pope's Butler Professes Innocence, But Says He Betrayed Pontiff

Pope Benedict XVI and his former butler, Paolo Gabriele (center), are shown at the Vatican in this file photo. The pope's private secretary, Georg Gaenswein, is on the left.
Andrew Medichini AP

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 5:14 pm

Pope Benedict XVI's former butler took the stand at his trial Tuesday and offered a somewhat contradictory message: He declared himself innocent of stealing papal documents, but acknowledged betraying the trust of Pope Benedict XVI.

As NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports, Paolo Gabriele, 46, is charged with stealing documents pointing to corruption and power struggles with the church. Prosecutors say Gabriele has confessed to giving the material to an Italian journalist, and that his motive was to expose "evil and corruption" in the church.

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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

House Committee: Washington Denied More Security For Libyan Consulate

The U.S. Consulate in Benghazi after an attack by an armed group.
Esam Omran Al-Fetori Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 1:00 pm

Before the attacks on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans, the U.S. mission had made "repeated requests" for more security at the compound.

According to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform those requests by U.S. mission in Libya were denied by "officials in Washington."

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