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Shots - Health News
11:37 am
Fri November 9, 2012

How Changing Visual Cues Can Affect Attitudes About Weight

Pictures like these helped British researchers gauge people's attitudes about weight.
Courtesy of Martin Tovee

With most Americans fat or fatter, you'd think we'd be lightening up on the anti-fat attitudes.

Alas, no. Even doctors often think their overweight patients are weak-willed.

But changing negative attitudes about body size might be as simple as changing what you see. When women in England were shown photos of plus-sized women in neutral gray leotards, they became more tolerant.

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'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
11:20 am
Fri November 9, 2012

It's All Politics, Nov. 8, 2012

Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 12:05 pm

  • Listen to the Roundup

Election Day has come and gone, but NPR's Ron Elving and Ken Rudin are still trying to make sense of it all. Was it close? Well, a 50-to-48 percent popular-vote edge for President Obama certainly indicates that.

But the president won just about every battleground state, pushing his Electoral College totals into landslide proportions. And, the Democrats did far better in the Senate than anyone expected.

The Two-Way
11:06 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Iran Says It Shot At U.S. Drone, Because It Trespassed

In this Sept. 6, 2007 photo, an MQ-1 Predator unmanned aerial vehicle flies over a range in Nevada.
MSgt. Scott Reed AP

The Iranian defense minister confirmed today that his forces had shot a U.S. drone. But Brig. Gen. Ahmad Vahidi said it shot at the MQ1 Predator drone because it had trespassed into its airspace, The New York Times reports.

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NPR Story
11:02 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Oliver Sacks: Hallucinations

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 12:03 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman. In his new book "Hallucinations," Oliver Sacks writes that you see with your brain, not with your eyes. And his book suggests our brains can play some bizarre tricks on is. Dr. Sacks describes a musician who sees intricate but unplayable sheet music superimposed on his field of vision.

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NPR Story
11:02 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Climate Change Takes Flight in New Novel

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 8:53 am

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

Here's a big, giant question for you: Why do we believe what we believe? And how is it that two people can look at the exact same set of circumstances and see two completely different things? That philosophical question is at the center of a new book where, to put it another way, one person's beautiful miracle is another person's ecological crisis.

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