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2:27 am
Fri October 25, 2013

A Family Bible And Other Heirlooms, Found Online

This poster from 1904 describes Charles Jamieson as a petty thief, crap shooter, "glib talker and general all-around crook and hobo." An online business helps reunite people like Jamieson's descendants with such pieces of their family history.
Joy Shivar

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 5:43 am

At the recent International Collectibles and Antiques Show in Charlotte, N.C., dealers spread out items in different booths. The warehouse looks like an old-school flea market, except for Joy Shivar's booth.

She's on her laptop, demonstrating JustAJoy.com. Enter a name in a database, and see if something hits.

The website bills itself as a family heirloom exchange for sellers and buyers. That's not unusual — there is eBay, after all.

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U.S.
2:26 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Newtown Residents Demolish A School, And Violent Memories

In June, people gathered in Newtown, Conn., to remember the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 8:55 am

Demolition has begun at Sandy Hook Elementary School, where a gunman killed 20 students and six adults last December. Bricks will be pulverized, steel melted down and a new school built at the same location.

Allison Hornak attended Sandy Hook Elementary School as a kid. After college, she returned home to Newtown, Conn., and opened an art gallery that's within walking distance of where the mass killing took place.

Hornak says she has a lot of fond memories of Sandy Hook — like a teacher who let her chew gum in class, and the pathways through the school.

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Around the Nation
2:23 am
Fri October 25, 2013

How To Solve A Sky-High Commuting Conundrum

Commuters headed to Oregon Health and Science University use cars, bikes and streetcars to connect with Portland's aerial tram, which whisks them up and over south waterfront neighborhoods.
David P. Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 4:03 pm

This story is part of a series on commuting in America.

Imagine a hospital on top of a mountain. How would doctors and patients get in and out? In Portland, Ore., commuters don't have to drive up a twisty, two-lane road to get there. Instead, they glide up 500 feet in the air in a gleaming silver gondola.

Portland's aerial tram connects the south waterfront down near the river to the Oregon Health and Science University on top of Marquam Hill.

For nurse Sara Hone, it has changed her commute. "I love it. I can't imagine a time without it," she says.

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Movie Reviews
1:15 am
Fri October 25, 2013

'Capital' Thrills In A Global Game Of Thrones

A former economics professor (Gad Elmaleh) gains entree into the house-of-cards world of high finance when he suddenly becomes head of a venerable French bank.
Cohen Media Group

Costa-Gavras' propulsive 1969 thriller Z, a thinly veiled account of the assassination of a Greek democratic politician by a military junta, shaped the political passions of many in my upstart generation. It also instilled in one impressionable young critic-to-be the conviction that the revolution would come packaged with the likes of Yves Montand as boyfriend material.

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The Two-Way
6:12 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

Guy On Train Live Tweets Former CIA Chief's On-Background Interview

Ret. Gen. Michael Hayden, right, and Tom Matzzie.
Twitter

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 7:25 pm

You'd think he'd be more careful: The man who was once responsible for the National Security Agency and the Central Intelligence Agency was giving a background interview during a train ride, but he didn't notice that a fellow passenger was live tweeting the highlights.

In truth, we didn't learn any secrets from Ret. Gen. Michael Hayden, but Tom Matzzie, who used to work for the liberal group MoveOn.org, provided a riveting — and funny — account of the ordeal on his Twitter feed.

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