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Author Interviews
4:26 am
Wed October 16, 2013

After Sept. 11, Special Ops Were 'Injected With Steroids'

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 4:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This time last week an alleged terrorist known as Abu Anas al Libi was on a Navy ship being interrogated after being snatched from his home in Libya by U.S. Special Forces. Yesterday, al Libi was arraigned in a federal court in New York accused in the 1998 U.S. embassy bombings in East Africa that left 224 dead.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Around the Nation
4:24 am
Wed October 16, 2013

We Say Goodbye To Detective Munch, Umpire Wally Bell

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 4:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And now for a little "Law and Order." It's the popular franchise with many spinoffs that once seemed in danger of taking over the entire television spectrum.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Each episode begins in the criminal justice system and goes on to feature shocking crimes solved by wise-cracking, hard-boiled cops.

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Business
3:42 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Banks Ease Purse Strings On Luxury Home Loans

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 4:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And for the first time in decades, interest rates for loans on jumbo homes are lower than rates for a typical mortgage. And because of that, the luxury market is the fastest growing home loans sector.

From member station KJZZ in Phoenix, Peter O'Dowd reports.

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National Security
3:37 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Has Elite Interrogation Group Lived Up To Expectations?

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 4:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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Research News
3:11 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Why College Freshmen May Feel Like Impostors On Campus

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 10:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Tens of thousands of freshman have just finished their first month in college. They've signed up for classes, met a bunch of other people and, if history is any guide, asked themselves a question: What am I doing here? Everyone else is smarter and better adjusted than I am. And for some, that question totally changes the college experience, may even cause them to drop out, which is why a researcher was determined to intervene. He told his story to NPR's Shankar Vedantam, who's here to tell it to us. Hi, Shankar.

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