News from NPR

Pages

You Must Read This
6:03 am
Sun November 10, 2013

A Youngest 'Daughter' Remembers Famines, Shame And Hope

AFP/Getty Images

Hong Ying's autobiography, Daughter of the River, is doubly astonishing. First, it's an account of the Cultural Revolution that's not written by an intellectual. There's a certain genre of Chinese memoir that looks at upheaval under Mao through an elite lens, and I have to admit, I've been growing tired of those books. But Hong Ying comes from a very different background indeed.

Read more
Theater
4:11 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Here's A Wild Idea For Shakespeare: Do It His Way

Mark Rylance as Olivia (right) and Samuel Barnett as Viola in Twelfth Night. The Broadway production, which first played at London's Globe Theatre, is done in the Elizabethan tradition, with an all-male cast.
Joan Marcus

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 11:54 am

This season, New York audiences have seen wildly different interpretations of Shakespeare plays. They've seen the Romeo of Orlando Bloom make his first entrance on a motorcycle; they've seen a production of Julius Caesar set in a women's prison.

Now the London-based company from Shakespeare's Globe Theatre has landed on Broadway with what seems like the most radical concept of them all: plays staged in a style Shakespeare would've recognized, with all-male casts, period costumes and live music.

Not A Museum

Read more
The Kennedy Assassination, 50 Years Later
4:10 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Inconsistencies Haunt Official Record Of Kennedy's Death

Jacqueline Kennedy (center), with Edward and Robert Kennedy on either side, watches the coffin of President John F. Kennedy pass on Nov. 25, 1963.
Keystone/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:03 pm

The first thing T. Jeremy Gunn says when you ask him about President John F. Kennedy's assassination is, "I'm not a conspiracy theorist. I don't have a theory about what happened."

Read more
The Two-Way
12:50 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Thousands Feared Dead After Typhoon Haiyan

Residents rest outside a stadium used as an evacuation center in Tacloban, Leyte province, central Philippines on Sunday after devastating Typhoon Haiyan hit the city on Friday.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 11:16 am

The vicious typhoon that raged through the center of the Philippines appears to have killed hundreds, if not thousands of people, and officials were reportedly struggling Sunday to distribute aid to survivors left homeless and destitute.

Deaths in the province of Leyte — mainly from drowning and collapsed buildings — could escalate to 10,000, the regional police chief told the AP. The administrator of the province capital, Tacloban, said the toll could climb that high in the city alone.

Read more
National Security
4:23 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Edward Snowden's NSA Revelations Keep Coming

Since June, documents leaked by National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden have produced revelation upon revelation about the nation's top-secret intelligence gathering operations. The latest information, about U.S. spying on foreign leaders, has angered even some dependable U.S. allies. New York Times national security reporter Scott Shane, and Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., a senior member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, discuss the latest Snowden-related leaks.

Pages