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World
10:25 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Reparations May Not Mean What You Think It Means

Fifteen countries in the Caribbean are seeking reparations from their former colonial masters for the lasting harm slavery has had on their countries. Host Michel Martin talks about the effort with Jermaine McCalpin from the University of West Indies in Jamaica.

World
10:25 am
Tue November 12, 2013

In Dominican Republic, An Emotional Fight Over Citizenship

Thousands of people in the Dominican Republic are being stripped of their citizenship by that country. Host Michel Martin talks to Miami Herald reporter Jacqueline Charles about why Dominicans of Haitian ancestry are denouncing the decision.

Health
10:25 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Trans Fat Ban Could Bring Smaller Waistlines ... But At What Cost?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later today, in our parenting conversation and in honor of Native American Heritage Month, we want to take a closer look at research that suggests that the use of Native American imagery for sports and school mascots could actually be psychologically damaging to Native American children. We want to find out more about this later this hour.

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The Salt
10:12 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Have Bitcoin To Burn? Next Stop Could Be The Farm

Economists say small-business owners — especially farmers dealing in high volume and low profit margins — are more likely to accept a volatile currency like Bitcoin than bigger businesses.
Allen Sheffield Flickr

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 1:54 pm

For food producers who sell directly to consumers, credit cards are both a blessing and a curse.

They're a way to do business with cashless customers, but 3 percent of every credit card sale is usually charged to the farmer as a transaction fee. That adds up in a high-volume, low-profit business like agriculture.

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The Two-Way
10:02 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Egypt Lifts 3-Month-Old State Of Emergency

Women supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted president Mohamed Morsi take part in a march through the streets of Cairo on November 8, 2013.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 10:44 am

Following a court decision Tuesday, Egypt has lifted a three-month-old state of emergency that was implemented following the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi. The court ordered the state of emergency lifted two days before the government intended to do so.

Egypt's Al-Ahram newspaper reports:

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