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The Two-Way
6:39 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Book News: 500 Authors Demand International Bill Of Digital Rights

Canadian author Margaret Atwood, pictured in 2009, is part of a group of writers lobbying the United Nations over digital rights.
John MacDougall AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 7:34 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
6:37 am
Tue December 10, 2013

LISTEN: President Obama Delivers A Eulogy For Nelson Mandela

President Obama delivers a speech Tuesday during the memorial service for late South African President Nelson Mandela in Johannesburg.
Alexander Joe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 11:41 am

During Tuesday's memorial service at South Africa's largest soccer stadium, President Obama delivered a 20-minute eulogy that compared Mandela to Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Abraham Lincoln and America's founding fathers.

Mandela, Obama said in Johannesburg, was the "last great liberator of the 20th century." He was not only a man of politics, but a pragmatist and flawed human being who managed to discipline his anger to turn centuries of oppression into what Mandela liked to call a "Rainbow Nation."

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National Security
6:29 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Surveillance Revelations Give Creative Writers Pause

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 11:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

For much of this year we've been hearing headlines effectively saying the government is spying on you. Spy agencies like the National Security Agency gather and store phone records, vacuum up emails by the billions, listen in on foreign leaders' telephone conversations and more. Now a nonprofit writers group, the PEN American Center, is exploring whether the fear of surveillance is affecting creative expression.

It's a question our colleague, David Greene, wanted to explore.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Arts & Life
6:29 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Art Or Junk? Detroit's 'Heidelberg Project' Endures

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 9:51 am

An outdoor art installation in Detroit made from blighted homes and objects is stirring up controversy again. A rash of arsons in the past seven months have destroyed four of the Heidelberg Project's signature homes. But after nearly 30 decades of working on this project and facing resistance, artist Tyree Guyton is determined to make more art.

The Two-Way
6:21 am
Tue December 10, 2013

French Court Sentences Executive For Selling Faulty Breast Implants

Originally published on Tue December 10, 2013 1:16 pm

A French court has sentenced the head of a company that sold tens of thousands of defective breast implants to four years in prison for aggravated fraud. Poly Implant Prothese was once among the world's leaders in supplying implants. But its product was found to have a high rupture rate.

From Paris, NPR's Eleanor Beardsely reports:

"The Marseilles court convicted Jean-Claude Mas, the founder of the company, and three colleagues.

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