News from NPR

Pages

Research News
7:01 am
Sun January 5, 2014

Searching For The Science Behind Reincarnation

Originally published on Sun January 5, 2014 10:13 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
7:01 am
Sun January 5, 2014

Two Times Harder

NPR

Originally published on Sun January 5, 2014 10:13 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a pair of two-syllable words. The first syllable of the word answering the first clue has the letters A-R, pronounced "are." Change these phonetically to "er," and you'll get a new word that answers the second clue. For example, given "hair-cutter" and "a North African," the answer would be "barber" and "Berber."

Read more
Author Interviews
7:01 am
Sun January 5, 2014

'On Such A Full Sea': A Fable From A Fractured Future

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun January 5, 2014 10:13 am

Fast-forward to a few hundred years into the future: Resources in the United States are scarce. The government has fallen apart and most of the population has left, looking for a better life somewhere else.

Immigrant laborers — many from China — have come to fill the labor void, and life in the new America is divided into three distinct societies. First, the Charters, walled-off cities populated by the elites. Next are the working-class cities where the laborers live, and last are the lawless and wild places in between.

Read more
Around the Nation
7:01 am
Sun January 5, 2014

Despite Scandals, Nation's Crime Labs Have Seen Little Change

Annie Dookhan, a former chemist, during her arraignment in Brockton, Mass., in January 2013.
Jessica Rinaldi Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun January 5, 2014 11:33 am

The nation's crime labs are no strangers to scandal. Last year in Massachusetts, bogus testing by former chemist Annie Dookhan called into question tens of thousands of cases and led to the release of more than 300 people from the state's prisons.

Read more
Three Books...
6:02 am
Sun January 5, 2014

When Modernism Met Science Fiction: Three New Wave Classics

The original paperback cover for Joanna Russ' 1975 novel The Female Man (detail above) called the book "startling."

A fan named Peter Graham once said that the golden age of science fiction is 12. That's true for me, although like many other fans I'd insist that my first exposure to SF happened during the real golden age. The decade from 1965 to 1975 was science fiction's so-called New Wave, when the genre took on both the turmoil of the '60s and the literary techniques of high modernism. The mix of the two created spectacular results, as dozens of energized writers penned scores of wonderful books. To this day their impact is being recognized; 2014 will see Samuel R.

Read more

Pages