News from NPR

Pages

The Edge
5:18 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Sochi's Stray Dogs Melt Hearts, And Put Officials On Defensive

Olympic volunteers pet a stray dog in downtown Sochi, Russia, on Tuesday. The city's long-standing contract with a pest control company has animal right groups concerned about the fate of the many strays roaming the area.
Kevin Dietsch UPI /Landov

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 7:28 pm

It's after dark in Sochi, and a pack of stray dogs is hogging the sidewalk like they own the place. There are a dachshund mix, several random mutts and one dog that looks like it may be part chow. They're cute and look like pets; seemingly well-fed and with decent pedigrees.

That is, until a fight breaks out. It's loud but ultimately more dog park than street fight, and the dogs quickly get back to prancing around and eating abandoned leftovers.

Read more
Movie Reviews
5:02 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

'Lego Movie': A Goofy Toy Story That Genuinely Clicks

In The Lego Movie, ordinary-guy Emmet (Chris Pratt) is expected to save the world with the help of a rebellious crew that includes Wyldstyle (Elizabeth Banks) and Vitruvius (Morgan Freeman).
Warner Bros.

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 6:24 pm

Read more
The Two-Way
4:27 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Senate Fails To Advance Unemployment Bill, Again

Originally published on Mon February 10, 2014 5:53 pm

For a second time, the Senate has failed to advance a bill that would restore unemployment benefits for an estimated 1.7 million Americans, who have been out of work for the long term.

The bill is essentially dead, because Senate Democrats could not cobble up the 60 votes needed to end debate on the measure. Without enough Republican support, the vote tally was 55-to-42.

The New York Times reports:

Read more
Movie Reviews
4:02 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

A Horror Comedy With 'Everything' And Then Some

Simon Pegg (Sean of the Dead, Star Trek) plays Jack, a writer gone paranoid while working on a book about 19th-century murderers.
Gaiam Vivendi

Read more
Movie Reviews
4:02 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

The Holocaust Recalled, Again, Through The Eyes Of 'The Unjust'

In 1975, Shoah director Claude Lanzmann interviewed Benjmain Murmelstein, the last surviving Elder of the Jews of the Czech Theresienstadt ghetto, at his home in Rome. The resulting film is The Last of the Unjust.
Cohen Media Group

With a running time of more than nine hours, Claude Lanzmann's monumental 1985 documentary, Shoah, was never destined to become a mass audience draw. But this sober, taxing, utterly absorbing attempt to document the Holocaust grows ever more essential precisely as our collective memory is increasingly eroded by the reductive shorthand of emaciated bodies or piles of shoes discarded by concentration-camp inmates as they went to their terrible fate. For Lanzmann, understanding trumps empathy.

Read more

Pages