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WIUM Local
8:01 am
Tue April 20, 2010

Lee County Recorder's Office Cuts Hours

Keokuk, IA – Seven employees work in the Lee County Recorder's offices in Keokuk and Fort Madison. Five are considered full-time, including Recorder Nancy Booten, while the other two work on a part-time basis.

Booten recently suspended three of her full-time employees with pay. Being so short-staffed has forced her to reduce the hours her office is open.

The Fort Madison office is now open on Mondays and Wednesdays. The Keokuk office will be the only office on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

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WIUM Local
11:55 pm
Mon April 19, 2010

Keokuk To Get No Help With Two Intersections

Keokuk, IA – Keokuk Public Works Director Gerald Moughler says replacing traffic signals at one intersection costs about $250,000. There are ten intersections with traffic signals on Main Street in downtown Keokuk.

The Iowa Department of Transportation has money available for replacing traffic signals at intersections that meet certain usage guidelines.

Members of the Keokuk City Council have learned that the intersections of 8th & Main and 9th & Main do not qualify for state funding.

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WIUM Local
11:19 pm
Mon April 19, 2010

Keokuk Holding Off On Street Projects

Keokuk, IA – Keokuk has accepted bids for the next two phases of its multi-year, multi-million dollar street reconstruction program. The city council held public hearings on the projects during its recent meeting.

The construction work will go no farther, though, because the panel assigned the projects to the finance committee.

Chairwoman Susan Dunek says her committee must decide whether Keokuk can go forward with the current project list. The total price tag for the work is about $1.8-million.

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Afternoon Edition
6:07 pm
Mon April 19, 2010

Afternoon Edition

Tri States News – Today's National, State and Local News for the Tri States

WIUM Local
1:12 pm
Mon April 19, 2010

Monmouth Tea Party Peacefully Protests Government Spending

Monmouth, IL – The political movement known as the "tea party" has gained strength and recognition over the past year. Much of the attention has gone toward what some call the movement's "fringe" element. But a recent rally in Western Illinois did not exhibit such elements.

Nearly 100 people gathered at Monmouth College on tax day to say they're "taxed enough already." There were no counter-protests, and no off message outbursts as seen at other rallies across the nation.

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