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Emily Boyer

Macomb Historian & Activist Killed in Crash with Train

Gil Belles, age 76, professor emeritus of Western Illinois University's Recreation, Park, and Tourism Administration (RPTA) department, was killed when his car collided with an Amtrak train.

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By Frode Ramone from Oslo, Norway - DSCF0673.jpg, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=46979581

Lee County Scaling Back Proposed Animal Control Ordinance

 

Comptroller Susana Mendoza says she’s not sure when school districts will receive state money owed to them for the rest of this school year. Mendoza’s office is in charge of paying the state’s bills.

A controversial abortion measure was approved Wednesday in the Illinois Senate. It would expand government funding of the procedure.

There was another setback Wednesday for efforts to end Illinois' budget stalemate.

Senate Democrats attempted a series of test votes on items in the so-called “grand bargain.” But Republicans refused to go along, saying more negotiation is needed to reach a deal they can support.

Let's Play a Game

May 10, 2017
Rich Egger

When I was growing up my family spent a lot of time playing games. Board games, word games, travel games. We had games for every event and occasion.

Jason Parrott / TSPR

The two highest-ranking members of the Lee County Attorney's office officially traded jobs this week, making Clinton Boddicker the county's third lead prosecutor in 2017.

A judge ordered Midwest Academy to pay former employee Cheyenne Jerred $748,800 in her whistleblower lawsuit against the shuttered Lee County boarding school for troubled teens.

T.J. Carson

Cafe in the Park has been a Wednesday afternoon summer tradition in Galesburg for decades. It's where someone can enjoy food from local restaurants and live music in an outdoor setting. But organizer Bill Morris said he won’t have time to put on the event this summer.

Police departments can quickly disseminate information to the public through various social media sites.  That has the Shop Talk panel wondering whether journalists should de-emphasize their coverage of police blotter items.  The issue was also recently raised on the website for CJ&N, which is a media market research company.

T.J. Carson

Galesburg aldermen approved a contract with J.C. Dillon of Peoria for $1.7 million to do the first phase of a lead water service line replacement program. The work is scheduled to begin next month.

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

At the public library in the rural Morgan County town of Brush, Colorado, Marissa Velazquez welcomes her students to class. It's a sunny Saturday morning, and today marks the halfway point in Velazquez's class, a ten-week crash course on American history, civics and English.

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Celebration Concerts

The Yellow-Bellied Sapsuckers, 7:00pm, October 7, Vallillo/Holtz Performance Studio, Macomb

The Yellow-Bellied Sapsuckers perform original songs and fiddle tunes inspired by the classic hillbilly, western-swing, and old-time fiddling traditions—and they also mine this same repertoire for forgotten gems that deserve to be heard again. The duo performs frequent concerts at a variety of venues and events and are known for engaging their audiences and putting them at ease with their light-hearted stage presence. They also regularly perform as a dance band for square and contra dances....

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Harvest Public Media

File: Abbie Fentress Swanson / Harvest Public Media

As the Trump administration takes the initial steps toward renegotiating one of the country's most influential and controversial trade deals, groups that represent farmers and ranchers are already waving a caution sign.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

This summer in cornfields in Iowa and Nebraska, about a thousand small point-and-shoot digital cameras will be enclosed in waterproof cases, mounted on poles, and attached to solar-powered battery chargers. They will take pictures every ten minutes as plants grow; all part of a plan to create better seeds.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Farmers and ranchers, with their livelihoods intimately tied to weather and the environment, might not be able to depend on research conducted by the government to help them adapt to climate change if the Trump Administration follows through on campaign promises to shift federal resources away from studying the climate.

Frank Morris / For Harvest Public Media

There have always been Americans worried about some pending religious, social, or natural cataclysm. The business of catering to those fears and helping people prepare to survive the next big calamity, though, has changed substantially in the age of President Donald Trump.

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

At the public library in the rural Morgan County town of Brush, Colorado, Marissa Velazquez welcomes her students to class. It's a sunny Saturday morning, and today marks the halfway point in Velazquez's class, a ten-week crash course on American history, civics and English.

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The Forgottonia Files

Tri States Public Radio introduces you to the people, the places, the rich history, and the ongoing struggles that make the Forgottonia region remarkable.